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Regal Cinema, Evesham

Art Deco style cinema in Evesham, Worcestershire.

Not perhaps as high deco as the Regal, Rochdale, or the Embassy, Braintree, this is still clearly deco with its rounded corner, the rule of three in windows to left and chevron patterned doors:-

Regal Cinema, Evesham

Central portion:-

Regal Cinema, Evesham, Close up

Doors:-

Doors, Regal Cinema, Evesham

From left. Rule of three in windows again:-

Regal Cinema, Evesham from Left

Rochdale 1-0 Accrington Stanley

English Football Tier 3,* Spotland,** 24/11/18.

As you can tell from this post’s title I’ve been away again. Down to see friends in Rochdale and seizing the opportunity to take in my first ever English League game. Not my first game in England – that was in Oswestry earlier this year, that wonderful magical night.

Rochdale AFC Programme 24/11/18

As you can see from the programme cover it was celebrating Ian Henderson’s 100 goals for the club.

My main impression overall was that the players’ work rate was higher than in the SPFL (Tier 3 or 2.) In particular the pressing was sharper and quicker.

I was a bit surprised to recognise the referee (from highlight games.) It was none other than Lee Probert. A high profile referee for a 3rd tier game surely?

Rochdale started on the front foot but Stanley’s more direct style soon had them making inroads at the back. Dale’s keeper Josh Lillis was only just back from injury and initially looked shaky, spilling the ball on his first contact but he was called on three times in the first half and made good stops each time. Stanley seemed prepared to shoot on sight but were only on target those three times. Dale tended to play the ball about at the back and tried to pass their way through but mostly didn’t penetrate. Dale’s number 7 scurried about, though, and his running style reminded me very much of Kenny Miller. Stanley had more of the first half but lacked that clinical edge.

Things changed in the second. Dale substitute forward Calvin Andrew immediately brought a new focus to the attack. Whatever Ian Henderson’s qualities winning high balls isn’t to the fore. Andrew put himself about and won the first four of his aerial duels. Thereafter the man marking resorted to climbing over him to get the ball. The Dale fans weren’t too keen on Probert’s failure to penalise that.

For all Dale manager Keith Hill’s desire to play football it was ironic that the goal came from that most basic of football attacking ploys, an inswinging corner. Ian Henderson worked himself room in the box to head it down and in. I thought the keeper might possibly have done better and kept it out but it squirmed under him. So goal no. 101 for Hendo. I think it was Dale’s only effort on target.

Stanley pushed in the final ten minutes but were reduced to long range efforts only, none of which troubled Lillis. Young David Perkins came on and perked up Dale’s midfield. He looked very much one for the future. Apparently Dale’s football academy is now one of the most respected in England.

It was a good result for my first experience of Spotland which is a tidy ground with stands on all four sides, the one behind the goal at Dale’s favourite end standing only. Stanley’s supporters filled the middle portion of the stand opposite the main one and made a lot of noise at the start. This faded towards the end. Dale’s supporters were notably more quiet and only roused thenselves a few times but it seems they take a good lot on away trips.

*EFL Tier 2 – call it Sky Bet League One if you must.

**The Crown Oil Arena, no less – it’ll always be Spotland to me.

A Cathedral to Spare*

I thought I’d take a respite from Norway for a while so here are some pictures of Liverpool where our friends from Rochdale took us on one of our days with them.

Liverpool is a bustling city with a lot of fine architecture.

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral from the side of the River Mersey:-

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

It’s a traditional kind of building, quite chunky and solid.

View from the road:-

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 2

Liverpool Catholic Cathedral is by contrast in a much more modern style, a bit like a tepee in appearance:-

Liverpool Catholic Cathedral

Keeping up the ecclesiastical theme, the bus tour we were taken on stopped at traffic lights by St Luke’s, a bombed out church which wasn’t restored after World War 2 as reminder and memorial:-

St Luke’s bombed out church:-

Bombed out Church, Liverpool

St Luke’s Church spire:-

Bombed out Church Spire

*As the line from the song In my Liverpool Home has it,

More Rochdale

I liked this frieze above the windows of Rochdale Museum:-

Rochdale Museum Frieze

Also these stained glass windows which seem to be on someone’s extension:-

Stained Glass Windows, Rochdale

Across the road from the Museum was a green park-like area with this iron pedestrian bridge:-

An Iron Pedestrian Bridge in Rochdale

Nearby was this statue of John Bright:-

Statue of John Bright, Rochdale

John Bright Statue, Rochdale

This spire-y thing is by the side of the road. I’ve no idea what it’s for:-

Roadside Spire

The town centre has this statue of sheep (rams):-

Statue of Rams, Rochdale Town Centre

And spot the dedication on the bridge (which I ought to have placed in yesterday’s post):-

Co-operation

Rochdale Co-operation

Rochdale is the home of the modern Co-operative Movement, through the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers

The original site of their first shop, in Toad Lane, is now a museum:-

Co-operative Museum, Rochdale

Side view with Co-op Tea painted on the brick:-

Rochdale Co-op

The museum extends into the modern building you can see on the left in the first photo.

Just up Toad Lane are two shopfronts which are Victorian in appearance with lovely stained glass:-

Old Shop Windows, Rochdale

More Old Shop Windows, Rochdale

On the other side of the entrance to Toad Lane is a memorial to the Kobe earthquake, which, from its inscription, seems to have something to do with the Co-operative movement:-

Kobe Earthquake Memorial, Rochdale

Rochdale War Memorial

Like the Cenotaph in London (and the one in Manchester) Rochdale’s War Memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens.

It lies opposite the Town Hall, but not facing it, with a memorial gardens behind.

Inscribed “1914-1919 and 1939-1945”. The carved wreath encloses the arms of Rochdale:-

Rochdale War Memorial

The Stone of Remembrance faces the Town Hall and is inscribed, “Their name liveth for evermore.” The small bronze plaque reads, “To all those who died in the service of their country”:-

Rochdale War Memorial 2

Strictly speaking the memorial is not a cenotaph (empty tomb) as it has a figure of a recumbent soldier wrapped in his greatcoat at its summit:-

Rochdale War Memorial 3

Rochdale War Memorial Gardens which serve as Rochdale’s memorial to the Second World War:-

Rochdale War Memorial Gardens

A Gallipoli Memorial lies between the Main War memorial and the Memorial Gardens:-

Gallipoli Memorial, Rochdale

The Memorial Gardens, inscribed as a Memorial to the Rochdale members of the Lancashire Fusiliers :-

Rochdale Lancashire Fusiliers Memorial

In front of and behind the Memorial – at right angles to the Town Hall – are two memorial benches:-

Rochdale War Memorial Bench

Rochdale War Memorial Bench, 1939-1945

Buildings in Rochdale

Apart from the Town Hall there are several fine buildings in Rochdale town centre, a few of them banks or former banks.

Royal Bank of Scotland, RBS:-

Royal Bank of Scotland, Rochdale

This has “bank” inscribed in the stone above the door but is somewhat anonymous now:-

Old Bank Building, Rochdale

Lloyd’s Bank (the rounded building):-

Lloyd's Bank, Rochdale

If you look closely at the above picture you can see a blue plaque. It was once the Union Flag Inn. In 1745 a confrontation between the Jacobite forces of Bonnie Prince Charlie and the town authorities took place here:-

Union Flag Inn as was, Rochdale

Beside Lloyd’s Bank is the very modern Beales and behind and above both a building with faded writing on the brick. “Rochdale (something I can’t make out; equitable?) Pioneer Society (something I can’t make out.)” The Co-operative movement started in Rochdale (see later post):-

Above Beales and Lloyd's Bank, Rochdale

This building has a fine cupola:-

Cupola'd Building Rochdale Town Centre

St Chad’s, Rochdale

St Chad’s is Rochdale’s Parish Church and stands on a slight prominence above the town centre from which it is screened by trees.

This photo is a stitch to get the whole length in:-

St Chad's, Rochdale Parish Church

The Church tower:-

St Chad's Parish Church, Rochdale, Tower

Detail on tower roofline:-

St Chad's Church, Rochdale, Detail

A set of stocks – the old mediƦval punishment apparatus – lies in St Chad’s churchyard.

Set of Stocks, St Chad's, Rochdale

As does a Great War Memorial Cross. Here’s the side view:-

War Memorial, St Chad's, Rochdale

The base on which the pillar stands is inscribed “In proud and loving memory of those who gave their lives in the Great War 1914-1919”:-

St Chad's, Rochdale, War Memorial

Art Deco in Rochdale (iii) Various Buildings

Lloyd’s Bank in full. Part of the building also appeared in my post entitled Art Deco in Rochdale (ii):-

Lloyds Bank Building, Rochdale

This one has aspects of Deco styling. At the time I visited it seemed to house an information centre about Rochdale:-

Deco Style Frontage, Rochdale

From side:-

Deco Style in Rochdale

This one now houses a Vet’s:-

Art Deco Building, Rochdale

Wynsor’s:-

Wynsor's Rochdale

Poundworld as was. (It won’t be a Poundworld now.)

Former Poundworld, Rochdale

Watan Cash and Carry. (Photo taken hastily from passenger window of the car I was being driven in.)

Watan Cash and Carry, Rochdale

A tin in the Co-operative Museum, showing the Co-operative’s Art Deco former Tea Warehouse in Salford, Manchester:-

Tin Featuring Art Deco Building

Rochdale Town Hall Interior

I meant to photograph the Minton foor tiles in Rochdale Town Hall’s foyer but there were people making it difficult to get the whole pattern in, both when we entered and on the way out so I didn’t. They are beautifully set into large squares whose perimeters contain various royal mottos such as “Dieu et Mon Droit” (used by the UK monarch outwith Scotland) and “Nemo Me Impune Lacessit” the ancient one of the Scottish kings usually uttered in Scots as “Wha daur meddle wi’ me?” or as I translated into Glaswegian to our friends from Rochdale who’d taken us there, “Don’t mess wi’ me, pal.”

A small portion of the tiled floor can be seen in my photo of the staircase in my Rochdale Town Hall, Stained Glass post. Other images can be found here.

The ground floor vaulted ceiling is a bit Islamesque:-

Rochdale Town Hall Interior 1

One of the function rooms has a magnificent hammer beam ceiling:-

Rochdale Town Hall interior

Along with decoration:-

Ceiling in Rochdale Town Hall

And a similarly magnificent fireplace:-

Rochdale Town Hall fireplace

Wood panelling on the walls:-

Interior, Rochdale Town Hall

Wall decoration:-

Wall Decoration Rochdale Town Hall

I liked these internal doors:-

Internal Doors, Rochdale Town Hall

And the old signage:-

Old Signage Rochdale Town Hall

There’s even decoration in the corridor to the toilets:-

Rochdale Town Hall, Corridor to Toilets

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