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Queensferry Crossing (xi) and HMS Prince of Wales

We happened to be going under the new Forth Road Bridge on our way to Norway the day they opened it to foot passengers (for the one and the only time.) Our eldest son and his intended entered the draw and won tickets for that. I don’t think they’re in these photos. (Forth Road Bridge in background in first one.)

New Forth Road Bridge 56

Queensferry Crossing

Before we set sail, HMS Prince of Wales, the second new Royal Navy aircraft carrier, could be seen from the dock at Rosyth:-

Aircraft Carrier, Rosyth Dockyard

Queensferry Crossing from the River Forth:-

New Forth Road Bridge 57, From the River

From below:-

New Forth Road Bridge 58, From Below

Bridge Support from the river:-

New Forth Road Bridge 59, Support, from the River

East side, from the river, looking south:-

New Forth Road Bridge 60

East side, from the river, looking north, Forth Road Bridge to right:-

New Forth Road Bridge 61

Yorkshire Memorial, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres, Flanders

Yorkshire Memorial from Essex Farm Cemetery. The memorial overlooks the Ypres-Yser canal:-

Yorkshire Memorial, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Closer View. Inscription reads “XLIX West Riding Division 1915 1918.”

Yorkshire Memorial Essex Farm Cemetery Closer View

Dedication, “To the memory of all ranks of the 49th West Riding Division who gave their lives for King and Country in the Great War 1914 1918.”

Dedication,Yorkshire Memorial, Essex Farm Cemetery

1915, 1916 and 1917 Battle Honours:-

Yorkshire Memorial, Essex Farm Cemetery, 1915, 1916 and 1917 Battle Honours

1917 1918 Battle Honours:-

Yorkshire Memorial, Essex Farm Cemetery 1917 1918 Battle Honours

Rochdale 1-0 Accrington Stanley

English Football Tier 3,* Spotland,** 24/11/18.

As you can tell from this post’s title I’ve been away again. Down to see friends in Rochdale and seizing the opportunity to take in my first ever English League game. Not my first game in England – that was in Oswestry earlier this year, that wonderful magical night.

Rochdale AFC Programme 24/11/18

As you can see from the programme cover it was celebrating Ian Henderson’s 100 goals for the club.

My main impression overall was that the players’ work rate was higher than in the SPFL (Tier 3 or 2.) In particular the pressing was sharper and quicker.

I was a bit surprised to recognise the referee (from highlight games.) It was none other than Lee Probert. A high profile referee for a 3rd tier game surely?

Rochdale started on the front foot but Stanley’s more direct style soon had them making inroads at the back. Dale’s keeper Josh Lillis was only just back from injury and initially looked shaky, spilling the ball on his first contact but he was called on three times in the first half and made good stops each time. Stanley seemed prepared to shoot on sight but were only on target those three times. Dale tended to play the ball about at the back and tried to pass their way through but mostly didn’t penetrate. Dale’s number 7 scurried about, though, and his running style reminded me very much of Kenny Miller. Stanley had more of the first half but lacked that clinical edge.

Things changed in the second. Dale substitute forward Calvin Andrew immediately brought a new focus to the attack. Whatever Ian Henderson’s qualities winning high balls isn’t to the fore. Andrew put himself about and won the first four of his aerial duels. Thereafter the man marking resorted to climbing over him to get the ball. The Dale fans weren’t too keen on Probert’s failure to penalise that.

For all Dale manager Keith Hill’s desire to play football it was ironic that the goal came from that most basic of football attacking ploys, an inswinging corner. Ian Henderson worked himself room in the box to head it down and in. I thought the keeper might possibly have done better and kept it out but it squirmed under him. So goal no. 101 for Hendo. I think it was Dale’s only effort on target.

Stanley pushed in the final ten minutes but were reduced to long range efforts only, none of which troubled Lillis. Young David Perkins came on and perked up Dale’s midfield. He looked very much one for the future. Apparently Dale’s football academy is now one of the most respected in England.

It was a good result for my first experience of Spotland which is a tidy ground with stands on all four sides, the one behind the goal at Dale’s favourite end standing only. Stanley’s supporters filled the middle portion of the stand opposite the main one and made a lot of noise at the start. This faded towards the end. Dale’s supporters were notably more quiet and only roused thenselves a few times but it seems they take a good lot on away trips.

*EFL Tier 2 – call it Sky Bet League One if you must.

**The Crown Oil Arena, no less – it’ll always be Spotland to me.

More Liverpool War Memorials

There is a cluster of memorials on the riverfront of the Mersey in Liverpool – all relating to World War 2.

The SS Arandora Star was torpedoed west of Donegal on 2/7/1940. Over 800 drowned:-

Arandora Star Memorial, Liverpool

HMT Lancastria was sunk off St Nazaire 17/6/1940 while evacuating British servicemen and civilans. Up to 6,000 people lost their lives:-

HMT Lancastria Memorial, Liverpool

Memorial to ranks and ratings who died on shore with no known grave:-

On Shore Navy Casualties Memorial. Liverpool

Repatriation Memorial, commemorating the return of Far East prisoners of war and detainees:-

Repatriation Memorial, Liverpool

Albert Dock, Liverpool

This was where the ITV programme This Morning used to be broadcast from. There was a weather map floating on the dock’s surface.

Weather Map photo (from Wikipedia) taken by Mike Pennington:-

This Morning weather map

Many years after its weather presenter spent his mornings leaping from Britain to Ireland and back again he was prosecuted for child abuse, found guilty and jailed. Liverpool is most likely glad ITV moved from there some time ago.

Albert Dock, Liverpool:-

Albert Dock, Liverpool

The dock is now home to a variety of pleasure boats while the old warehouses on the docks are filled with shops and eateries.

Boat in Albert Dock:-

Boat in Albert Dock, Liverpool

View of and from Albert Dock, Liverpool with Museum of Liverpool, Cunard Building and Royal Liver Building in the background:-

View of and from Albert Dock, Liverpool

Meanwhile Back

The Beatles song about Penny Lane in Liverpool makes it sound quite urban but at the end where the famous street sign is it’s leafy. (That’s our tour bus parked at the side of the road):-

Penny Lane

Street name sign. (Not original. They keep getting nicked):-

Penny Lane sign

More leafiness but beginnng to get built-up:-

Penny Lane, Liverpool

Still more buildings:-

More of Penny Lane, Liverpool

Mostly residential but a few workplaces. Some of the workers wave at the tour bus:-

Penny Lane

There’s a barber shop in this one (but I didn’t see a banker waiting for a trim):-

Barber Shop, Penny Lane, Liverpool

End of Penny Lane. The white-painted building is the Penny Lane Hotel:-

Penny Lane Continuation, Liverpool

Not Penny Lane but instead the road where Paul McCartney was brought up. (The bus isn’t allowed to go along it as there’s no suitable turning place):-

McCartney's Road

The Beatles: Penny Lane

Let Me Take You Down ….

…. because I’ve been to Strawberry Fields. (Or more correctly it seems Strawberry Field.):-

Strawberry Fields, Liverpool

Behind these gates was apparently a children’s home and though Wikipedia has John Lennon climbing into the place to play with them the guide on the bus tour our friends had booked said he would play truant from his own school hoping to catch a glimpse of girls beyond the trees behind the gates.

The present gates are replicas:-

Strawberry Fields

When Lennon’s parents’ marriage fell apart he was taken in by his Aunt Mimi.

This is her house. They had a reasonably comfortable existence here you’d think:-

John Lennon's Aunt Mimi's House Liverpool

Note the notice on the gate post and the blue plaque on the house:-

Aunt Mimi's house

In Liverpool reminders of the Beatles are never far away. Sgt Pepper flower bed:-

Sergeant Pepper Flower Bed, Liverpool

Memorial plaque:-

Beatles Memorial Plaque

The Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever

Stratford-upon-Avon War Memorials

I seem not to have posted this before even though I took the photogaphs in April 2012.

Stratford-upon-Avon has two civic war memorials, one for the Great War, moved to near the river from its original location, and another for the Second World War on a wall nearby.

Great War Memorial:-

Stratford-upon-Avon War Memorial

World War 2 memorial:-

Stratford-upon-Avon War Memorial Wall

This web page shows the memorials’ relative dispositions.

On another nearby wall is King Edward’s School Boat Club War Memorial – for both wars:-

King Edward's School Boat Club War Memorial

Between the Great War Memorial and the Second World War Memorial lies a memorial to an individual. I’m afraid I can no longer remember whom it commemorates and the writing is too indistinct to make out when magnified.

Stratford-upon-Avon Individual War Memorial

A Cathedral to Spare*

I thought I’d take a respite from Norway for a while so here are some pictures of Liverpool where our friends from Rochdale took us on one of our days with them.

Liverpool is a bustling city with a lot of fine architecture.

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral from the side of the River Mersey:-

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

It’s a traditional kind of building, quite chunky and solid.

View from the road:-

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral 2

Liverpool Catholic Cathedral is by contrast in a much more modern style, a bit like a tepee in appearance:-

Liverpool Catholic Cathedral

Keeping up the ecclesiastical theme, the bus tour we were taken on stopped at traffic lights by St Luke’s, a bombed out church which wasn’t restored after World War 2 as reminder and memorial:-

St Luke’s bombed out church:-

Bombed out Church, Liverpool

St Luke’s Church spire:-

Bombed out Church Spire

*As the line from the song In my Liverpool Home has it,

Goodbye to Olden

I took this photo from the ship as we were leaving Olden. It’s a local hotel and has Art Deco/Moderne styling but may be later in construction:-

Art Deco/Moderne Style Hotel, Olden, Norway

There’s a turf-roofed chalet to the right of centre on this photo of the hillside behind the pier:-

Turf Roofed Chalet, Olden, Norway

The locals gave us a flag-waving send-off:-

Farewell from Olden Locals

There was someone in one of the higher up chalets waving a Union Jack but I didn’t manage to get the picture. The ones on the pier had a musical accompaniment:-

Musical Farewell from Olden, Norway

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