Aberdeen 1-0 Dumbarton

Scottish Cup* Fourth Round, Pittodrie Stadium, 18/1/20.

Once again, we wuz robbed.

After Sons had held out for 87 minutes Aberdeen’s striker Sam Cosgrove went over like a sack of spuds in the penalty box. (Well, he’d been falling over every time a Sons player came near him all game so why would he give up the habit with three minutes to go?) Once again the ref bought it. And Cosgrove put away the penalty.

So, despite not a shot on target and only one corner won in the whole game – and that almost into stoppage time – one of the best Sons displays in the last few years ended up without reward. Defensively we were brilliant. Okay maybe they had thirteen or so chances – but they only caused Conor Brennan in our goal to exert himself about three times.

This Aberdeen side was a pale shadow of the team we played in the Cup Quarter-Final (six years ago now,) ponderous, unimaginative, plodding, but we’re not even a patch on what we were back then (as I said to my son during the game we’re not even a darn on that side) so this was a magnificent performance. It deserved better reward than a dodgy penalty against with three minutes to go. But them’s the breaks when you’re a wee team.

Again the assembled Sons fans trotted out those old favourites “What a shitey home support,” “We forgot that you were here,” “SPL, you’re having a laugh,” (admittedly that one’s really out of date now) and “You only sing when you’re winning.” Instead of Jamie Langfield it was that same Sam Cosgrove who was told, “you’re a wanker, you’re a wanker.”

Notwithstanding the final result it was a great day out. That sense of togetherness in the away section and the support for the team were both superb.

*William Hill Scottish Cup,

War Graves, Newburgh

I have posted about Newburgh before, but I hadn’t visited its cemetery until in August 2018 I found four graves each with a possible war link.

Regulating Petty Officer A S Anderson, RN, HMS St George, 14/5/1944, aged 43:-

War Grave, Newburgh Cemetery

Corporal J MacNaughton RAF, 8/9/1946, aged 28:-

Newburgh War Grave

Private J Blyth, The Black Watch, 3/1/1915:-

Great War Grave, Newburgh

An unusual one this. It has a Commonwealth War Graves style headstone but is inscribed, “Alexander Ilytch Shenkman, born Moscow 29/11/1923, died Newburgh 21/2/2004.”:-

Grave Newburgh

Kilrenny War Memorial, Cellardyke

The Parish is Kilrenny but since most of the war dead in the Great War were from Cellardyke the memorial was placed in Cellardyke, in a commanding position overlooking the sea. Steps lead up to it.

Steps up to Kilrenny War Memorial

It has an unusual three-sided appearance:-

Kilrenny War Memorial

Kilrenny War Memorial Side View

Dedication. “Erected in proud and reverent memory of those connected with the Parish of Kilrenny who laid down their lives in the Great War 1914 1918.”

Kilrenny War Memorial Dedication

The three panels, above two of which are listed the Great War dead, are decorated with a wreath over crossed swords (under the dedication,) a soldier:-

Kilrenny War Memorial Figure of Soldier

and a sailor:-

Kilrenny War Memorial Figure of Sailor

The three “edges” are surmounted by stone lions with shields below respectively showing Kilrenny’s coat of arms:-

Kilrenny War Memorial

a steam drifter:-

Kilrenny War Memorial Shield

and a plough:-

Shield, Kilrenny War Memorial

Something Changed 30: I Think I’m Paranoid

A bit of all-out guitar rock from 1998.

The band’s third (equal) biggest UK hit at no 9.

Garbage: I Think I’m Paranoid

Kinross Memorial Hall

This was not originally a Memorial Hall. It lies just off Kinross’s High Street. It was under refurbishment when I photographed it.

Kinross Memorial Hall

Cartouche, inscribed, “Erected AD 1841 and presented to Kinross Burgh AD 1947 by Kinross Market Company in memory of the men and women of Kinross who fell and in grateful recognition of all who served in the Second World War 1939 – 1945.”

Kinross Memorial Hall Cartouche

The Story of a New Name by Elena Ferrante

Book Two, The Neapolitan Novels. Youth.

Europa Editions, 2015, 467 p. Translated from the Italian Storia del nuovo cognome (Edizioni E/O, 2012) by Ann Goldstein.

 The Story of a New Name cover

I was not overly impressed by Ferrante’s first novel of her Neapolitan Cycle, My Brilliant Friend, and wasn’t actively seeking out any more of them. I saw, though, the remainder of the quartet priced very reasonably in a second-hand book shop and felt I couldn’t pass them by. I’m now glad that I did, for this second instalment seemed to have much more to commend it than the first. There was certainly a better flow to the narrative.

This may be because this book didn’t have the almost relentless focus on courses taken and exams passed that the first had – those are still here but muted by the fact that narrator Elena Greco is by and large undertaking these herself and not contrasting her successes and failures so much with her comperes – or that her attention has shifted to gender relationships.

There is naturally more focus here on sexual politics than in a book about childhood friends. Her brilliant friend Lila’s marriage is blighted from the start by the conflict sown by that incident at the end of Book One of the trilogy where the shoes she designed were given on her wedding day by her husband-to-be to her sworn enemy. Lila is immediately subjected to that physical chastisement by her husband – prompted by the desire to be seen to be a man and followed by the phrase, “look what you’ve made me do ,” – to which women of her milieu seem to be resigned and turn a blind eye to in others. But dark glasses can only cover so much. Curiously, Elena’s first boyfriend, Antonio, despite his seeking (and selfishness for) his own sexual pleasure at her hands, behaves with sanctimonious (albeit in his case temporary) abnegation by denying her similar succour on the one occasion when she implicitly offers her body to him.

One aspect that seemed out of kilter, though, for all her academic excellence, was Elena’s apparent obliviousness to the wider world. She contrasts her lack of self-assurance, of knowing how to behave, the attitudes to have, in comparison to that of the scions of the middle class she meets in her high school and – later – University days. Her school professor more or less introduces her to newspapers – which Elana confesses to finding boring and confusing, under the influence of a University boyfriend she affects interest in left-wing politics but she never seems to connect them to her childhood neighbourhood. Poverty is something that simply exists, to be struggled against, naturally, but not considered systemic or alterable. Lila is of the opinion “that there was nothing that could eliminate the conflict between the rich and the poor,” because those at the bottom always want to be on top and those who are on top want to stay on top.

Nunzia, Lila’s mother, has one of the most striking lines in the book, ‘For your whole life you love people and you never really know who they are,” while Nella, the mother of the object of Elena’s unrequited affections, Nino Sarratore, in relation to Lila’s attractions tells Elena of men’s great fear in the face of female beauty, “that their thingy won’t function or it will fall off or she’ll pull a knife and cut it off.”

From certain incidents (most notably the narrator’s eventual loss of virginity being referred to as reproduced in detail in a later fictionalised telling) it would seem we are being invited to assume that Elena’s story is a disguised account of Ferrante’s own life but that would be to deny any degree of authorial artifice. In any case our narrator’s coming to wider prominence is not pseudonymous as ‘Ferrante’’s is in the real world. There is certainly a density of apparently lived experience, a proliferation of detail, a fecundity of (re)construction; but it is an author’s job to try to represent the world.

And once again, the novel ends on a cliffhanger of sorts. Not portending as much of a potential conflict between characters as that in My Brilliant Friend but a tease just the same.

Pedant’s corner:- In one of the blurbs at the front: “both The Days of Atonement and Troubling Love are tour de forces” (tours de force that would be.) In the Index of Characters; “Elena, who likes the story a lot, and gives it to” (no need for the “and”.) Otherwise: “I knew only I was not what I wanted at that moment,” (it was not what I wanted,) insure (ensure,) enroll (enrol,) milleniums (millennia,) curtsey (curtsy,) “I handed in my … tests when my schoolmates … had barely started on it.”

Dundee’s Art Deco Heritage 8: Fairfield Social Club, Drumgeith Park

Again, I’ve passed this countless times on my way to and from Brechin but only stopped to photograph it in August last year.

From road – complete with skip:-

Fairfield Social Club From Road.

From access road – skip again:-

Fairfield Social Club, Drumgeith Park, Dundee

The entrance doors are decoish too:-

Fairfield Social Club Entrance

Side view:-

Fairfield Social Club Again

Rear:-

More of Fairfield Social Club

Ian Sales’s 2010s

The last of Ian’s lists in response to the BBC’s one. He’s appended the whole 100 at the end of his final post.

I’ve read six of these but can’t remember if I read D C Compton’s Synthajoy back in the day.

Women of Wonder is on my tbr pile.

81 Lady Chatterley’s Lover, DH Lawrence (1928, UK)
82 Seven Miles Down, Jacques Piccard & Robert S Dietz (1961, USA)
83 Synthajoy, DG Compton (1968, UK)
84 China Mountain Zhang, Maureen F McHugh (1992, USA)
85 Correspondence, Sue Thomas (1991, UK)
86 Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (2013, USA)
86 God’s War, Kameron Hurley (2011, USA)
88 Evening’s Empire, David Herter (2002, USA)
89 Spomeniks, Jan Kempenaers (2010, Belgium)
90 The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers (1946, USA)
91 Leviathan Wakes, James A Corey (2011, USA)
92 Hear Us O Lord from Heaven Thy Dwelling Place, Malcolm Lowry (1961, Canada)
93 Girl Reading, Katie Ward (2011, UK)
94 The Wall Around Eden, Joan Slonczewski (1989, USA)
95 Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent, ed. (1974, USA)
96 HHhH, Laurent Binet (2012, France)
97 The End of Days, Jenny Erpenbeck (2012, Germany)
98 Nocilla Dream, Agustín Fernández Mallo (2006, Spain)
99 Party Going, Henry Green (1939, UK)
100 The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner (1931, USA)

Monikie War Memorial

Monikie is on the B961 road between Dundee and Brechin.

On the way back from the game at Brechin on 25/8/18 I stopped to photograph its Memorial Hall.

Monikie War Memorial Hall stitch

There is an inscribed Memorial in the grounds of the Hall but it is of relatively recent construction, perhaps for the 100th anniversary of the Great War:-

Monikie War Memorial

Names and dedication, “The Great War 1914 -1918.”

Close-up Monikie War Memorial

Western aspect. Inscribed, “In Flanders Fields the Poppies Blow.”

Monikie War Memorial Western Aspect

Eastern aspect. Inscribed, “Between the Crosses Row on Row.”

Monikie War Memorial Eastern Aspect

On the Hall’s external wall is a Great War 100th anniversary memorial plaque:-

Anniversary Dedication Monikie War Memorial Hall

I photographed two of the names of the fallen attached to trees in the small park area within which Monikie’s War Memorial stands.

L/Cpl James Spalding, Black Watch, killed in action, France, 16/6/1915, aged 22:-

Monikie War Memorial Tree

Pte John Irons, Royal Scots Fusiliers, killed in action France, 12/8/1916, aged 24:-

War Memorial Tree, Monikie

Glebe Park, Brechin, Addendum

From the path to the park which contains Brechin’s War Memorial there is a good view of the reverse of the beech hedge which forms the western boundary of Glebe Park. You can also see the David Will Stand in this photo:-

Beech Hedge, Glebe Park, Brechin

The following two photos were taken of Sons new strip for 2018-19 (now superseded again) at the game on 25/8/18, a game we should have won.

Sons New Strip for Season 2018-19

Sons New Strip 2018-19 Close Up

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