Battlefield Monument, Langside, Glasgow

The monument, now in the middle of a roundabout, commemorates the Battle of Langside, site of the last defeat in Scotland of Mary Queen of Scots, and is somewhat at odds with its modern surroundings.

From east:-

Battlefield Monument from East

From south:-

Battlefield Monument from South

From west:-

Battlefield Monument From West

Battlefield Monument plaque:-

Battlefield Monument Plaque

Planter at monument’s foot:-

Battlefield Monument Planter

Three Forth Bridges

Queensferry Crossing, Forth Road Bridge and Forth Bridge:-

Panorama from Rosyth:-

Three Bridges Across the Forth

From east:-

Forth Bridges

Forth Bridge from the River

North span:-

Forth Bridge, North Span

Middle and south spans:-

Forth Bridge, Middle and South Spans

From below; taken from deck of SS Black Watch:-

Forth Bridge From Below

North Span from east. (Part of Forth Road Bridge and of Queensferry Crossing to left):-

Forth Bridge North Span from East

Former Woolworths Stores in East London

Pictures shamelessly stolen from diamond geezer’s post. (I’ve only included the Art Deco buildings.)

572-574 Roman Road, Bow, E3 5ES:-

Former Woolies, Roman Road, Bow, E3 5ES

Hackney, 333/337 Mare Street, E8 1HY:-

Former Woolies, 333/337 Mare Street, Hackney, E8 1HY

72-76 High Street North, East Ham, E6 2JL:-

Former Woolies, 72-76 High Street North,  East Ham, E6 2JL

On Green Dolphin Street by Sebastian Faulks

Hutchinson, 2001, 345 p.

Love, sex, and death, again. Literary fiction doesn’t seem to stray far from those. Though I suppose there isn’t that much sex here, and death is mostly off-stage. Set in the late 1950s as they turn to the 60s, the love is that between Mary van der Linden, sojourning in Washington DC with her diplomat husband Charlie (whose career has stalled somewhat, perhaps because he is too fond of the bottle) and journalist Frank Renzo who is making a slow return after disfavour in the McCarthy years.

The book does describe the progress of what I assume is supposed to be a great love affair but unlike in Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger I didn’t really feel it, was never convinced. When Mary states her feelings for Frank they more or less come out of the blue as far as the reader is concerned. (His affections – or perhaps I should say intentions – were discernible from the outset.)

To add a bit of colour incidents from the characters’ earlier lives are incorporated into the narrative – Mary’s first lover, who died in the Second World War, Frank and Charlie’s almost forgotten meeting at Dien Bien Phu – as are contemporary events, particularly the first Kennedy-Nixon TV debate and Charlie’s breakdown on a visit to Moscow which sharpens the tale with a dose of Cold Wear paranoia. And everybody smokes like a lum.

I remember the author’s earlier novel Birdsong with some affection. On Green Dolphin Street, while readable enough, is no Birdsong

I did though learn that there is a Dumbarton Street in Washington DC!

Pedant’s corner:- USian usages – fender, hat-check girl, laundromat, elevator, the fall, bake sale, sidewalk etc – but aluminium not aluminum and railways [sic] sleepers not railroad ties. Otherwise; Commonweath war cemetery (at the time it would have been an Imperial war cemetery,) “sluiced it down” (twice in the space of a page or so is once too many,) croci (crocus isn’t from Latin, so crocuses,) “under the instructions of a man with a crew-cut called Don Hewitt” (why does his hair-do have a name? A minor edit would have got rid of this,) “which even in this light she could see where shot with blood” (were shot,) on to (onto,) railways sleepers (railway sleepers,) sprung (sprang.)

Not Friday on my Mind 52: Magic Carpet Ride

Steppenwolf’s other well known track. Never a hit in the UK. Then again, Born To Be Wild only reached no 30.

This seems to be a live performance of the album version with additional film inserts. There’s a touch more psychedelia than I’d remembered.

Steppenwolf: Magic Carpet Ride

Unusual View of Forth Road Bridge

From River Forth. Part of Forth Bridge to left:-

Forth Road Bridge From rIver

Forth Road Bridge from below:_

Forth Road Bridge From Below

Forth Road Bridge From Below Again

“Old” Forth Bridges

Forth Road Bridge with Forth Bridge behind.

North spans:-

"Old" Forth Bridges 1

South spans. Bow of SS Black Watch in shot:-

"Old" Forth Bridges 2

Theives

Yesterday I spotted in a charity shop in Kirkcaldy the legend, “Theives will be prosecuted.”

My immediate thought was, “So do thieves get away scot-free, then?”

On Monday I saw in the Guardian that for the first time there would be an episode of Doctor Who on New Year’s Day this year.

No. That would already have happened. The clue is in the name. New year.

The episode will actually be broadcast next year.

Queensferry Crossing (xi) and HMS Prince of Wales

We happened to be going under the new Forth Road Bridge on our way to Norway the day they opened it to foot passengers (for the one and the only time.) Our eldest son and his intended entered the draw and won tickets for that. I don’t think they’re in these photos. (Forth Road Bridge in background in first one.)

New Forth Road Bridge 56

Queensferry Crossing

Before we set sail, HMS Prince of Wales, the second new Royal Navy aircraft carrier, could be seen from the dock at Rosyth:-

Aircraft Carrier, Rosyth Dockyard

Queensferry Crossing from the River Forth:-

New Forth Road Bridge 57, From the River

From below:-

New Forth Road Bridge 58, From Below

Bridge Support from the river:-

New Forth Road Bridge 59, Support, from the River

East side, from the river, looking south:-

New Forth Road Bridge 60

East side, from the river, looking north, Forth Road Bridge to right:-

New Forth Road Bridge 61

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