Archives » Psychedelia

Not Friday on my Mind 53: I See the Rain. RIP Dean Ford

I was sad to hear the news of the death of Dean Ford, lead singer of (The) Marmalade (once known as Dean Ford and the Gaylords,) the first Scottish group to have a no 1 in the UK. To make it, of course, they had to leave Scotland and move to London where their initial efforts under their original name didn’t meet with much joy. Calling themselves The Marmalade also didn’t bring instant success. It was only when they adopted a more pop profile – and with songs written by others – that they achieved a measure of success, peaking with that no. 1, a cover of The Beatles’ Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.

Ford was no mean song writer though. Along with fellow band member Junior Campbell he wrote Reflections of My Life, Rainbow, and My Little One, hits between 1969 and 1971.

Plus this pre-success psychedelia-tinged song, said to be Jimi Hendrix’s favourite of 1967.

The Marmalade: I See the Rain

Thomas McAleese (Dean Ford): 5/9/1946 – 31/12/2018. So it goes.

Not Friday on my Mind 52: Magic Carpet Ride

Steppenwolf’s other well known track. Never a hit in the UK. Then again, Born To Be Wild only reached no 30.

This seems to be a live performance of the album version with additional film inserts. There’s a touch more psychedelia than I’d remembered.

Steppenwolf: Magic Carpet Ride

Friday on my Mind 159: William Chalker’s Time Machine

The Idle Race wasn’t the only Birmingham group to like (Here We Go Round) the Lemon Tree. The band that recorded the song here liked that earlier one so much they took their name from (part of) its title.

The somewhat psychedelic – not to say SF tinged – William Chalker’s Time Machine was written by Ace Kefford, who had just left The Move, and produced by Andy Fairweather-Low (of Amen Corner and solo fame) and Trevor Burton of …. The Move.

It didn’t bother the charts.

The Lemon Tree: William Chalker’s Time Machine

Friday on my Mind 153: Charles Brown

I had a comment this week on the post I made about my absolute favourite 1960s single, Rupert’s People’s Reflections of Charles Brown, to the effect that airplay for it had actually preceded the release of Procol Harum’s A Whiter Shade Of Pale but a hiatus in its own resulted in “Reflections” losing out.

In my post I noted a previous version from which “Reflections” had been adapted. The comment reminded me to try to source that single again. And I have succeeded.

So here is Charles Brown as by Sweet Feeling, a much more psychedelic effort than “Reflections”.

Sweet Feeling: Charles Brown

The song was actually the B-side of All So Long Ago, which I append here:-

Sweet Feeling: All So Long Ago

Friday on my Mind 147: Put Your Mind at Ease

This is an odd mixture of psychedelia and that USian vocal sound exemplified by The Association. The guitar intro is reminiscent of Paperback Writer and Pleasant Valley Sunday.

Edited to add: a cleaner sounding version than in the clip below is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DcN39Pc7uQ but I’ve also kept the original so that the following comments make sense.

Despite the hippy gear they still managed to look very USian and clean cut. But that keyboard player was so affected.

The miming in the clip is also pretty bad.

Every Mother’s Son: Put Your Mind at Ease

Not Friday on my Mind 44: Black Veils of Melancholy. RIP Rick Parfitt

Though it seems I didn’t, I thought I had mentioned in Friday on my Mind 29 that I actually bought Status Quo’s first hit Pictures of Matchstick Men, though they were The Status Quo then.

This follow-up – remarkably similar to that first hit and which appeared on the ludicrously titled first LP, Picturesque Matchstickable messages from the Status Quo – has a title that is all too appropriate, but has a bass line reminiscent of Hendrix.

The Status Quo: Black Veils of Melancholy

Richard John (Rick) Parfitt: 12/10/1948 – 24/12/2016. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 140: Journey to the Centre of the Mind

I’ve not posted a piece of psychedelia for a while so here are The Amboy Dukes performing on Spanish TV.

The Amboy Dukes: Journey to the Centre of the Mind

Friday on my Mind 108: Itchycoo Park – RIP Ian McLagan

I was sorry to hear yesterday morning of the death of Ian McLagan, keyboard player with the Small Faces and The Faces.

Itchycoo Park was a departure for the group, its phasing making it a part of the mid-60s psychedelia trend, but it does foreground his keyboard playing.

The Small Faces: Itchycoo Park

Ian Patrick ‘Mac’ McLagan; 12/5/1945 – 3/12/2014. So it goes.

The Trouble With Kurt Cobain and Nirvana (2)

Apart from calling his band Nirvana I once thought that Cobain’€™s use of the song title Smells Like Teen Spirit was pretty cool, a nice metaphorical touch. Then I found out Teen Spirit is actually some sort of American deodorant.

Not so cool at all, then. (Except under the arms of course.)

Here is the real Nirvana‘s track, Pentecost Hotel, their second single.

The Trouble With Kurt Cobain and Nirvana (1)

The trouble with Kurt Cobain was that he named his band Nirvana.

This means that whenever I mention the original Nirvana, the true Nirvana, I have to explain I don’€™t mean a grungy bunch from Seattle.

The earlier (1960s) Nirvana’€™s mainstays were Patrick Campbell-Lyons and Alex Spyropoulos. Together with producer Chris Blackwell they produced a series of idiosyncratic singles with classical/orchestral influences and also released what was probably the first concept album, The Story Of Simon Simopath, which had a quintessentially 60s psychedelic cover – complete with blocky unequal sized lettering.

This is their first single, Tiny Goddess, which has more than a hint of Pachelbel.

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