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Reelin’ in the Years 178: RIP Emitt Rhodes

Emitt Rhodes died this week. He never made much of an impact on the charts in the UK despite being championed on Alan Freeman’s radio show. It’s still sad to see him go.

There’s a mellotron sound here (I’m a sucker for a bit of mellotron) and echoes of Barclay James Harvest.

Emitt Rhodes: Till the Day After

This one’s a bit more rocky.

Emitt Rhodes: Really Wanted You

Emitt Lynn Rhodes: 25/2/1950 – 19/7/2020. So it goes.

Reelin’ in the Years 177: Only You Can. RIP Kenny Young

The song-writer and producer of 1970s band Fox died earlier this week. He also wrote Captain of Your Ship – a hit for Reparata and the Delrons in the 60s – Under the Boardwalk and some hits for Clodagh Rodgers.

A list of his hit songs is on Wikipedia.

The biggest of those in the UK were recorded by Fox. This looks like a Top of the Pops appearance.

Fox: Only You Can

Shalom Giskan (Kenny Young,) 14/4/1941 – 14/4/2020. So it goes.

Not Friday on my Mind 61: Oh Well – RIP Peter Green

I was so sad to hear of the death of guitarist Peter Green, late of John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac and the Peter Green Splinter Group.

I have featured his music before here and Here. Both of those songs speak of a troubled mind and it is no secret that Green found life and fame difficult (not helped by taking LSD.)

His work speaks for itself though.

The first clip – Oh Well Part 1 is a live performance and misses out the acoustic last part.

Fleetwood Mac: Oh Well Part 1:-

That acoustic part was repeated at the beginning of Oh Well Part 2 so is included below.

Fleetwood Mac: Oh Well Part 2:-

Peter Allen Greenbaum (Peter Green,) 29/10/1946 – 25/7/2020. So it goes.

Reelin’ in the Years 176: Run For Home

Just because I’ve been posting about the island from which the band Lindisfarne took its name.

The band had split after their third LP Dingly Dell in 1972 but reformed in 1978. Run For Home was taken from their punningly named comeback album Back and Fourth which featured a photograph of Lindisfarne Castle on its sleeve.

Back and Fourth cover sleeve

This is a Top of the Pops appearance from 1978.

Lindisfarne: Run for Home

Live It Up 70: War Baby

I mentioned before that I saw Tom Robinson play live before he came to wider prominence. He was in a band called Café Society and they were supporting somebody or other at the Apollo in Glasgow.

This is one from Tom’s post-Tom Robinson Band output.

Here’s (a very young looking!) Tom miming to War Baby on Top of the Pops in 1983.

Tom Robinson: War Baby

Something Changed 36: Laid

James formed in the 1980s but didn’t trouble the upper reaches of the UK charts till the 1990s.

This was one of the good lady’s favourites from that time.

James: Laid

Ennio Morricone

Composer Ennie Morricone‘s death this week was well marked. He was one of the few film composers whose name was known to the wider public. All in all he composed scores of, em, scores.

Back in the day my elder brother took a liking to the music from Sergio Leone’s “Dollars” films starring Clint Eastwood (and bought the soundtracks as I recall) so I remember this, which absolutely screams Western film tune, well:-

Theme to A Fistful of Dollars

Morricone’s theme to the third film in the trilogy, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, was turned into a UK number one hit by Hugo Montenegro and his Orchestra.

Later, Morricone’s Chi Mai became the title music to the TV Series The Life and Times of David Lloyd George on the back of which it also found chart success, but only to number 2.

Chi Mai

Ennnio Morricone: 10 /11/1928 – 6/7/2020. So it goes.

Edited to add; I forgot Gabriel’s Oboe composed for the film, The Mission.

SF Bookshelf Travelling for Insane Times (iii)

Another for Judith Reader in the Wilderness‘s meme.

This week, the remainder of my SF hardbacks. Click pictures to enlarge them.

More Ian McDonald, China Miéville, Christopher Priest, Keith Roberts, Kim Stanley Robinson, Robert Silverberg, a book of Art Deco posters which fits in nowhere else.

Science Fiction Hardbacks (iii)

On another shelf entirely, standing next to the above. This contains books by my not so secret SF vice, Harry Turtledove, plus one Gene Wolfe, among others. Above, on its side, is a book containing illustrated Bernie Taupin lyrics for early Elton John songs:-

Science Fiction Hardbacks (iv)

Friday on my Mind 192 and Reelin’ in the Years 175: The In Crowd

I give you two for the price of one this week. (Not that either of them actually costs anything.)

The In Crowd was hit in both these decades, first for Dobie Gray in 1965, then for Brian Ferry in 1974.

Here’s Dobie Gray in a US TV appearance.

Dobie Gray: The In Crowd

Ferry’s treatment of the song is a little different.

Brian Ferry: The In Crowd

Live It Up 69: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

A very unBritish sounding song this. It’s more like US soul music.

This seems to be a live TV performance with an extra section in the middle that wasn’t on the album version.

Deacon Blue: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

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