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Reelin’ In the Years 130: You’re a Lady, Love is the Sweetest Thing, Roll Away the Stone

I discovered two sad departures this week, both Peters, though one of them actually occurred in January.

Peter Skellern’s affection for the brass band sound made him stand out as a bit old fashioned in the early 1970s.

His biggest hit was You’re a Lady, no 3 in 1972.

Peter Skellern: You’re a Lady

I remembered his revival of Frank Noble’s song Love is the Sweetest Thing as being a bigger hit than in fact it was. It apparently only reached no 60. It has a brilliant lyric, though.

Peter Skellern: Love is the Sweetest Thing

Peter Overend Watts was Mott the Hoople’s bass player and is seen quite prominently in this clip:-

Mott The Hoople: Roll Away The Stone

Peter Skellern: 14/3/1947 – 17/2/2017. So it goes.

Peter Overend Watts: 13/5/1948-22/1/2017. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 148: Birth

The Peddlers were a frequent sight on UK TV at the back end of the 1960s and very early 1970s but never had much chart success. Birth, from 1969, was their biggest hit.

The piano riff is reminiscent of the one in Elton John’s Border Song which came out in 1970.

The Peddlers: Birth

Friday on my Mind 147: Put Your Mind at Ease

This is an odd mixture of psychedelia and that USian vocal sound exemplified by The Association. The guitar intro is reminiscent of Paperback Writer and Pleasant Valley Sunday.

Despite the hippy gear they still managed to look very USian and clean cut. But that keyboard player was so affected.

The miming in the clip is also pretty bad.

Every Mother’s Son: Put Your Mind at Ease

Reelin’ In the Years 129: Live Till You Die/Fresh As a Daisy

As I mentioned last week DJ Alan “Fluff” Freeman championed Emitt Rhodes (once of the Merry-Go-Round) when his first solo album came out in 1970, but that still didn’t make for much success in the UK.

On that self-titled LP there’s a strong feel of the Beatles feel to most of Rhodes’s songs, with a hint of Gerry Rafferty in the vocals.

Here are Live Till You Die and the more “pop”py Fresh as a Daisy.

Emitt Rhodes: Live Till You Die

Emitt Rhodes: Fresh as a Daisy

Friday on my Mind 146: You’re a Very Lovely Woman

I came across this when I was searching for Emitt Rhodes songs. It seems he started out in The Merry-Go-Round. Being a US (minor) hit I hadn’t heard it before or at least didn’t recall it. I do remember Alan Freeman championing Emitt Rhodes when his first solo album came out, in 1970 I think.

There’s a Zombies feel to the introductory guitar and the “strings” sound very like a mellotron to me.

I can’t resist the mellotron sound.

The Merry-Go-Round: You’re a Very Lovely Woman

Friday on my Mind 145: Gin House Blues

I heard this on the radio the other day and it reminded that before they drifted into a more “pop”py sound Amen Corner started out as a blues band.

This was a cover of a song originally titled Me and My Gin as recorded by Bessie Smith in 1928!

Amen Corner: Gin House Blues

Friday on my Mind 144: I Am a Cathedral

Everyone knows the big hit performed by Peter Sarstedt (who died earlier this week) Where Do You Go To (My Lovely). Many people think he was a one-hit wonder – even his Wikipedia entry says that about him despite mentioning he had two other hits (though I must confess I don’t remember Take Off Your Clothes – probably because it was a B-side) but the follow-up single Frozen Orange Juice did get to no. 10 in the UK.

His previous single to the big one wasn’t a hit though arguably it deserved to be.

Peter Sarstedt: I Am a Cathedral

Peter Eardley Sarstedt; 10/12/1941 – 8/1/ 2017. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 143: Garden of my Mind

More psychedelia. Why not?

During this I keep expecting the lead singer to follow the pause with “Is it tomorrow or just the end of time?”

I think the group’s name was perhaps a bit of a mickey take.

The Mickey Finn: Garden of my Mind

Live it Up 34: Rip George Michael

This category’s title is horribly inappropriate given today’s subject.

I didn’t take too much to Wham! Being a schoolteacher relatively new to the game in the early 1980s it was a mystery to me why certain acts inspired adolescent devotion. From the perspective of thirty years later this frothy concoction is more understandable. It exudes the exuberance of youth.

Wham!: Freedom

A more thoughtful sound soon appeared though. I heard Michael accorded Andrew Ridgley a writing credit on the song below despite him not being involved. The royalties have stood Ridgley in good stead ever since. Only one among Michael’s many charitable acts.

George Michael: Careless Whisper

Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou (George Michael:) 25/6/1963 – 25/12 /2016. So it goes.

Not Friday on my Mind 44: Black Veils of Melancholy. RIP Rick Parfitt

Though it seems I didn’t, I thought I had mentioned in Friday on my Mind 29 that I actually bought Status Quo’s first hit Pictures of Matchstick Men, though they were The Status Quo then.

This follow-up – remarkably similar to that first hit and which appeared on the ludicrously titled first LP, Picturesque Matchstickable messages from the Status Quo – has a title that is all too appropriate, but has a bass line reminiscent of Hendrix.

The Status Quo: Black Veils of Melancholy

Richard John (Rick) Parfitt: 12/10/1948 – 24/12/2016. So it goes.

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