Archives » 1980s

Live It Up 72: Absolute Beginners

One of Bowie’s many great songs. From 1986 and the film of the same name (itself adapted from a previous book.)

David Bowie: Absolute Beginners.

Live It Up 71: Sugar Mice

The second single from the Clutching at Straws album, which overall dealt with the effect, and strains, of continuous touring and presaged the split of Fish from the band.

This one contains one of Steve Rothery’s signature (and excellent) guitar solos.

Marillion: Sugar Mice

Live It Up 70: War Baby

I mentioned before that I saw Tom Robinson play live before he came to wider prominence. He was in a band called Café Society and they were supporting somebody or other at the Apollo in Glasgow.

This is one from Tom’s post-Tom Robinson Band output.

Here’s (a very young looking!) Tom miming to War Baby on Top of the Pops in 1983.

Tom Robinson: War Baby

Something Changed 36: Laid

James formed in the 1980s but didn’t trouble the upper reaches of the UK charts till the 1990s.

This was one of the good lady’s favourites from that time.

James: Laid

Ennio Morricone

Composer Ennie Morricone‘s death this week was well marked. He was one of the few film composers whose name was known to the wider public. All in all he composed scores of, em, scores.

Back in the day my elder brother took a liking to the music from Sergio Leone’s “Dollars” films starring Clint Eastwood (and bought the soundtracks as I recall) so I remember this, which absolutely screams Western film tune, well:-

Theme to A Fistful of Dollars

Morricone’s theme to the third film in the trilogy, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, was turned into a UK number one hit by Hugo Montenegro and his Orchestra.

Later, Morricone’s Chi Mai became the title music to the TV Series The Life and Times of David Lloyd George on the back of which it also found chart success, but only to number 2.

Chi Mai

Ennnio Morricone: 10 /11/1928 – 6/7/2020. So it goes.

Edited to add; I forgot Gabriel’s Oboe composed for the film, The Mission.

Live It Up 69: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

A very unBritish sounding song this. It’s more like US soul music.

This seems to be a live TV performance with an extra section in the middle that wasn’t on the album version.

Deacon Blue: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

Live It Up 68: Oblivious

Aztec Camera’s first hit. I must confess I thought it had reached higher than no 47 in the UK charts, but apparently not.

A supposedly live TV appearance from 1983 but it looks like miming to me.

Aztec Camera: Oblivious

Live It Up 67: Tour de France – RIP Florian Schneider

It’s not given to many musicians to change the course of popular music, but Kraftwerk certainly did. While not inventing electronic music (Delia Derbyshire and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop did that) they were the first to consider it as a new form of popular music. Sadly, founding member Florian Schneider died late last month.

I first heard of Kraftwerk in that famous Tomorrow’s World piece. At the time I thought their sound was a little soulless and wouldn’t catch on. It did.

Kraftwerk: Tour de France

Florian Schneider (Florian Schneider-Esleben:) 7/4/1947 – 21/3/2020. So it goes.

Live It Up 66: Golden Brown – RIP Dave Greenfield

I wasn’t really much into the Stranglers. They were/are however my brother-in-law’s favourite band.

It was nevertheless sad to hear of Dave Greenfield’s death, especially since he contracted coronavirus while in hospital with a heart problem.

Golden Brown however I found very much to my taste.

The Stranglers: Golden Brown

David Paul (Dave) Greenfield: 29/3/1949 – 3/5/2020. So it goes.

Live It Up 65: Leningrad

Well, Leningrad is what St Petersburg (see surrounding posts) was once named – and was so the first time I visited it. And when Billy Joel did.

The song is perhaps a bit too sentimental but also lies in that vein of historiography that was true of the same singer’s We Didn’t Start the Fire.

Billy Joel: Leningrad

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