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National Museum of Flight, East Fortune Airfield, East Lothian, Scotland.

I’d been wanting to visit the National Museum of Flight at East Fortune airfield, East Lothian, Scotland for ages. Last year we finally made it.

It has all the appearance of a Second World War airfield so familiar from films.

Buildings at National Museum of Flight

More Buildings, National Museum of Flight

National Museum of Flight, East Fortune

Control tower:-

East Fortune Control Tower

However, the airfield was first commissioned as a Royal Naval Air Station. This was the gate:-

Former Gates of East Fortune Airfield

The airfield’s complement was tasked with protecting shipping in the Firth of Forth and preventing airship attacks on Edinburgh or the navy and its base at Rosyth :-

East Fortune History

Hangar:-

Hangar, National Museum of Flight, East Fortune

Hangar Annexe, a Nissen Hut:-

Nissen Hut, A Hangar Annexe at East Fortune Airfield

War Related Death Commemorations, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

James Cutt, died of wounds, 6/7/1916, aged 21. Interred in St Sever, Rouen:-

War Death Commemoration, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Frederick Fox, 9th Royal Lancers, 29/1/1933, aged 30, erected by his regimental comrades:-

Member of Regiment Memorial, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Samuel White Fleming, killed in action at Arras, 23/4/1917, aged 21:-

Commemoration of War Death, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

It’s not entirely clear if this commemoration is war related. Bryan Hanby Holmes of Ba, Fiji, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, fell asleep, 9/11/1918, aged 38:-

Gravestone  War Death Commemoration

John Goodall, killed in action, High Wood, Somme, France, 23/7/1916, aged 23:-

Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh, War Death Commemoration

Major J Eadie Davidson, DSO, died of wounds in France, 16/10/1918, aged 25:-

War Death Commemoration, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

William Macfarlane, who fell in action on the Somme, France, 16/8/1916, aged 23:-

Edinburgh, Comely Bank Cemetery, War Death Comemoration

In loving memory of George Mason, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps, killed whilst flying, 4/5/1917, aged 18 years:-

War Death Plaque, Comely Bank Cemetery,  Edinburgh

I took 40 more photographs of individual’s war graves at Comely Bank, scattered all over the cemetery. That’s probably too many to post on Flick and here at the moment but I may do so at some time in future.

Groups of War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

J C Brydon, Air Mechanic 2nd class RN, HMS Sparrowhawk, 12/4/1945 age 19 and E J Chilcott, Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders, 25/8/1945, age 20:-

War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

There are 15 war graves in this photograph:-

Group of War Graves War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Second Lieutenant B Holmes, Royal Field Artillery, 9/11/1918, and fourteen others:-

More War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Lieutenant W H Franke, General list, 10/12/1919, Second Lieutenant C H Lone, Highland Light Infantry, 19/2/1918, Second Lieutenant D H Cheers, East Sussex Regiment attached Royal Air Force, 17/4/1918, age 17, plus others in background and one to side:-

War Grave Group, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Second Lieutenant H M Armstrong, Royal Flying Corps, 14/11/1917, age 21, Captain C F Collett, MC, 23/12/1917, age 31, Second Lieutenant G W Macallister, Royal Air Force, 17/8/1918, age 20, Second Lieutenant E F Hughes, Royal Flying Corps, 14/11/1917, age 24, Second Lieutenant R E McKiel, 6/9/1918, age 21. Reverse of another memorial stone behind:-

Six War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Lieutenant L R Joseph, Royal Flying Corps, 23/4/1917, age 18. Another war grave behind and five others in background:-

Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh, War Graves

Commonwealth War Graves, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

With the exception of Lyness Royal Naval Cemetery on Hoy, Comely Bank Cemetery in Edinburgh may possibly contain the most Commonwealth War Graves in one location anywhere in Scotland. 301 servicemen are buried here, from both wars. Its location near a hospital (or two) no doubt contributed to that.

Unusually the memorial stones in the Great War section are laid flat:-

Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh, War Graves

Flat memorial stones. The Stone of Remembrance is to the left here behind the shrubs:-

Flat Memorial Stones, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

More flat memorial stones:-

More Flat Memorial Stones, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh, More Flat Memorial Stones

Memorial Stones, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

All these flat stones commemorate more than one serviceman:-

Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh, Memorial Stones

Stone of Remembrance. It is inscribed, “1914-1918 1939-1945. To the honoured memory of his Majesty’s forces who gave their lives for their country and who lie buried in this cemetery. The following are not commemorated elsewhere. Private R Brines, Middlesex Regiment. 19/1 1920, Private A Brown, Highland Light Infantry, 9/1/1920, Private Jackson Robb, Royal Scots, 30/8/1921.”

Stone of Remembrance, Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh

Information board:-

Commonweath War Graves Commission Information Board

Edinburgh’s Art Deco Heritage 23: George Street

Funny I hadn’t really noticed this one before.

On corner of George Street and North Castle Street, Edinburgh.

Former Royal Bank of Scotland premises. Good detailing round the door:-

Building, George Street, Edinburgh

Its windows and railings, on North Castle Street:-

Windows and Railings, North Castle Street, Edinburgh

Poppy Time Again

Two days ago (Wednesday) I was in the Sainsbury’s at Straiton in Edinburgh. I happened to notice that the shop assistants’ name badges had poppies engraved on them.

It was October 10th! Over a month till Remembrance Day.

(Okay; same time interval as last year.)

Last night a woman in the Question Time audience was sporting a largish cloth poppy. First TV sighting of the year. At least I can be sure she wasn’t corralled into wearing it.

Art Deco Railway Station Model

As seen at Ingliston Antique Fair, Royal Highland Centre, Ingliston, Edinburgh, September 2017.

Model of Art Deco Railway Station

“Ground” level view:-

Art Deco Model, Railway Station

“Platform side” view:-

Art Deco Railway Station Model

Raqib Shaw: Reinventing the Old Masters

Also at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art’s Modern One (until 28th October) is the above titled exhibition featuring the work of Raqib Shaw.

Apparently he could not afford oil paints so started to use enamels. This gives his work the appearance of huge but intricately decorated ceramic tiles. Some of it is a bit “bling”y for me but the effect can be stunning and the detail is extraordinary particularly in the circular area of his reinvention of the Cranach. The reproductions here do not convey just how shiny his pictures are.

To do this must be so time consuming even if he does have assistants to help. I left wondering how on earth he could make a living doing this. Unless every (enamel? can you really call them paintings?) sells for tens of thousands of pounds.

Shaw speaks for himself here:-

NOW at Modern One

Meanwhile over Edinburgh’s Belford Road from Modern Two; at the Modern One gallery of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art is an exhibition called NOW which mainly features Jenny Saville. It’s on until 12th September.

Most of her paintings are larger-than-life-size portraits – or at least feature human figures.

Some of them verge on – or overstep the boundary of – grotesque:-

This one of what looks like a child is less so:-

The introductory video from the gallery website is below. The eyes of the child in the painting over the artist’s left shoulder are very well done.

Royal Scots Greys Memorial, Princes Street, Edinburgh

This memorial stands above Princes Street Gardens, to the south side of Princes Street, Edinburgh, and was originally erected to commemorate the men of the Royal Scots Greys who died in the Boer War, 1899-1902.

Royal Scots Greys Memorial Princes Street, Edinburgh

Dedication plaques facing Princes Street. The top one is the commemmoration of the dead of the Boer War (the Second Boer War, aka the South African War.) The lower plaque is to the Scots Greys fallen of the Second World War.

Dedication Plaques, Royal Scots Greys Memorial, Edinburgh

There are further dedication plaques on the western and eastern faces of the monument. The upper plaque here names privates of the Royal Scots Greys who died in the Great War. The lower states, “This memorial was erected in 1906 in memory of the Royal Scots Greys who gave thier lives in South Africa during the Boer War 1899 -1902. Tablets were added after the First World War 1914 to 1918 and after the Second World War 1939 to 1945. In 1971 the Royal Scots Greys amalgamated with the 3rd Carabiniers to form the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys.)”

Royal Scots Greys Memorial, Dedication Plaques

Here the upper plaque names officers, NCOs and men who died in the Great War. The lower plaque commemorates the dead of conficts since 1945; in Korea, Northern Ireland and Iraq.

Further Dedication Plaques, Royal Scots Greys Memorial, Edinburgh

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