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More Memorabilia of Empire Exhibition, Glasgow 1938

Here is a wonderful Art Deco poster for the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938, held in Bellahouston Park, Glasgow. I saw the poster for sale at Ingliston Antiques Fair in Edinburgh:-

Poster for Empire Exhibition, Glasgow 1938

There, too, was this brilliant Art Deco style chocolate box lid showing one of the two Scottish Pavilions at the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938:-

Chocolate Box, Empire Exhibition 1938

Also at the same Ingliston Antiques Fair I saw this framed photo of an Art Deco building which looks as if it may have been (still be?) a hotel. The flag standard is flying a French tricolour.

Framed Photo of Art Deco Building

Art Deco Antiques

I saw these in an antiques centre last year and had to photograph them.

Tin with lid showing the Albion Hotel, Miami Beach:-

Tin with lid showing the Albion Hotel, Miami Beach

There are more photos of the Albion Hotel on Flickr.

Bakelite model of Tower of Empire at the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow, 1938. The lower card insert says, “Balcony holds 600 people. Height 470 feet above sea level. Overlooking six counties.”

Bakelite Model of Tower of Empire at the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow, 1938

Tower of Empire by Night, Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938

I haven’t done one of these 1938 Empire Exhibition posts for a while but these are two crackers.

On left the Tower of Empire by Night; a Brian Gerald art-drawn postcard by Valentine’s for the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow 1938.

On the right the South Cascade and Tower by Night, Empire Exhibition 1938: a colourised postcard of the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow, 1938.

Tower of Empire by Night
South Cascade and Tower by Night, Empire Exhibition 1938

The Tower at night must have been a wonderful sight.

True to Life Exhibition at Modern Two, Edinburgh

A couple of weeks age we revisited the True to Life Exhibition at Modern Two, (Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art,) Edinburgh.

I’ve left this a bit late as the exhibition is only on for a few more days now. Its full title is True to Life, British Realist Painting in the 1920s and 1930s.

I found this to be much more enjoyable than the Beyond Caravaggio exhibition recently finished at the Scottish National Gallery (see also here.)

The first picture in True to Life, though, David Jagger’s “Conscientious Objector”, would not have looked out of place at that Beyond Caravaggio exhibition. It exploits light in much the same way as those did. This is apparently a self-portrait:-

Conscientious Objector by David Jagger

“By the Hills” by Gerald Leslie Brockhurst features on the True to Life Exhibition catalogue cover though for me it’s a bit too sharply delineated. The artist was said to have used lipstick to paint the lips here:-

By the Hills by Gerald Leslie Brockhurst

Another such too sharp picture was Meredith Frampton’s “A Game of Patience”:-

A Game of Patience by Meredith Frampton

As with the David Jagger painting above Edward Baird’s “Dan Cross” also looks as if it could leap off the canvas. I feel as if I know this person:-

Dan Cross by Edward Baird

Keith Henderson’s The Harbour Crowd is another fine example of the capture of light. As I recall this painting was one of the exhibits in the Palace of Arts at the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938. There was a black and white reproduction in the relevant souvenir booklet.

The Harbour Crowd by Keith Henderson

Some of the paintings in “True to Life” stretched the definition of realist somewhat.

Though it does contain figures (including the artist) “The Deluge” by Winifred Knights seemed to me to be at least influenced by Vorticism:-

The Deluge by Winifred Knights

Nora Russell by John Downton captures the impatient aspect of the early adolescent schoolgirl very well. I get the impression she didn’t really want to be painted:-

Nora Russell by John Downton

Kingsway, Empire Exhibition 1938

Another Brian Gerald art-drawn picture of the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938. This one shows the avenue called the Kingsway.

Kingsway, Empire Exhibition 1938

And this is a black and white photographic postcard of the same avenue from a little further up showing the Palace of Industries.

Kingsway, Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938

Tower & Lake Illuminations at the Empire Exhibition 1938

Another stunning art-coloured postcard by Brian Gerald from the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938.

The Lake Illuminations, Empire Exhibition 1938

Two more stunning art-drawn postcards by Brian Gerald from The Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938. These are both of the Lake Illuminations.

This one also shows a piece of statuary.

Glasgow Exhibitions Display at the People’s Palace

There is a small display at the People’s Palace on Glasgow Green which shows images of Glasgow’s various International Exhibitions.

The colour picture at the top is of the 1901 Exhibition, a panorama of that same exhibition is below it, a sepia depiction of the 1888 Exhibition lies below the writing, a view of the Scottish Pavilion at the 1938 Empire Exhibition is to the left and a poster stamp of the Empire Exhibition’s logo in red is below that.

The colour picture is of the Main Pavilion at the 1901 Exhibition:-

The mostly blue picture is of the interior of one of the two Scottish Pavilions at the 1938 Empire Exhibition:-

Here’s the poster stamp in a closer up version:-

The People’s Palace also has one of the jigsaws of the Empire Exhibition:-

Note the (oddly shaped) missing piece of the jigsaw. I actually have a complete example of this jigsaw at home (a companion piece to this) but it’s still in a box somewhere due to the house move last year.

The Tower of Empire by Night

Another colourised postcard of Thomas Tait’s Tower of Empire by night, at the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938. (See a previous one here.) This shows off well the illumination of the upper canopies plus has the Moon in the background.

Colonial Pavilions at the Empire Exhibition 1938

Here are two more of my collection of postcards of the Empire Exhibition, Scotland 1938.

The first shows three of the Colonial Pavilions, part of the South African building on left – one of the few “traditional” structures present (rather than the deco/moderne that dominated the Exhibition) – then New Zealand and finally Canada. As ever Thomas Tait’s Tower of Empire is in the background.

This next one is captioned wrongly. It shows the South African and New Zealand Pavilions and not Australia.

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