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Brechin War Memorial

After all those visits to Brechin to see the mighty Sons of the Rock play away against Brechin City last year in August in preparation for yet another visit I finally looked up where Brechin’s War Memorial is located. It turned out it’s very near the football ground in a pleasant park area.

It’s an impressive sandstone column:-

Brechin War Memorial

Side view:-

Brechin War Memorial From Side

World War 2 Dedication. “To the glory of God and in grateful remembrance of those who gave their lives in the Second World War 1939 – 1945.” Below the names, “Greater love hath no man than this.”

World War 2 Dedication, Brechin War Memorial

Great War Dedication, “To the undying memory of the men of the City and Parish of Brechin who gave their lives in the Great War 1914 – 1919. Their name liveth for evermore,” and names Ada – Cla:-

Brechin War Memorial Great War Dedication

Great War names Cob – Hod:-

WW1 Names, Brechin War Memorial 8

Great War names Hoo-Pai:-

Great War Names Brechin War Memorial

Great War names Pet – You:-

Brechin War Memorial Great War Names

Other Conflicts; Kenya, Northern Ireland, Korea, Malaya. Plus additional names for France 1916, Burma 1945, and Mediterranean 1942:-

Brechin War Memorial, Other Conflicts

50th Northumbrian Division Memorial, Oxford Road, Wieltje, Belgium

50th Northumbrian Division Memorial, Wieltje, Belgium

Close-up. The Dedication reads, “to the enduring memory of all ranks of the 50th Northumbrian Division who fell in the Great War 1914 – 1918 and in memory of their comrades of the same division who gave their lives in the war of 1939 – 1945 for the liberation of France, Belgium and Holland.” On the lowest plinth, “Pro Patria.”

50th Northumbrian Division Memorial Close-up

Side inscription, “The Ayrshire Yeomanry; the Yorkshire Hussars; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, Northumbrian Brigade, RFA; Northumbrian Amminition Column; Northumbrian Divisional Engineers, RE; 50th Divisional Train, RASC; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, Northumbrian Field Ambulance, RAMC; Northumbrian Division CCS; Northumbrian Vet Section, RAVC; RAOC.”

Inscription 50th Northumbrian Division Memorial, Wieltje, Belgium

Other side inscription, “149th Infantry Brigade: 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th Northumberland Fusiliers; 5th Border Regiment.
150th Infantry Brigade; 4th East Yorks; 4th, 5th Yorkshire Regiment Green Howards; 5th Durham Light Infantry.
151st Infantry Brigade: 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th Durham Light Infantry; 5th Loyal North Lancs Regiment.”

50th Northumbrian Division Memorial Inscriptions

Memorial Information Board:-

50th Northumbrian Division Memorial Information Board

The view from the 50th Northumbrian Division Memorial is now so peaceful:-

View From 50th Northumbrian Division Memorial

So much so alpacas were ruminating by the memorial:-

Alpacas by 50th Northumbrian Division Memorial

Rochdale Town Hall, Stained Glass

One of the striking features of Rochdale Town Hall’s interior is the stained glass windows many of which feature portraits of the Kings and Queens of England.

The windows flanking the entrance though have stained glass representations of the coats of arms of European countries, here Greece, France, Belgium, Turkey, Russia and Portugal:-

Rochdale Town Hall, Stained Glass Windows 1

The other such window betrays the building’s age. Coats of arms for Sweden & Norway, Prussia, Switzerland, Spain, Denmark and Austria. Note Sweden & Norway, as was (they separated in 1905) and Prussia which, subsumed the rest of Germany in 1871.

Stained Glass Window, Rochdale Town Hall

Grand staircase:-

Rochdale Town Hall Staircase

This is a closer view showing the stained glass window on the half-landing to greater effect.

Rochdale Town Hall, Stained Glass

Berriedale and Braemore War Memorial

This memorial is situated just off the A 9 at Berriedale (almost at the lowest point of the Berriedale Braes, a particularly hair-raising descent to and ascent from a river valley containing the Berriedale Water and the Langwell Water.)

The main aspect of the memorial faces north:-

Berriedale War Memorial

The photograph below shows the World War 2 dedication. Names on left here are for the Great War, those killed or died of wounds and – unusually – those wounded. The smaller list on right names World War 2 dead and the memorial’s architects are named at the bottom:-

Berriedale War Memorial Showing World War 2 Dedication

The memorial from the west. In another unusual touch the names on this side of the memorial are of those who served in the Great War (and presumably survived it):-

Dunbeath and Berriedale War Memorial from West

From west to north to east the pillar is surmountd by the words “Their Name Liveth Evermore” with the theatres of war Palestine, Salonika, France, Belgium, Egypt and Gallipoli, engraved towards the base.

Dedication. “Honor et Gloria. To commemorate the patriotism of the men of Berriedale and Braemore who fought on land and sea some of them giving their lives for their king and country during the Great War 1914-1918 and in thankfulness to God for the victory their valour helped to win”:-

Berriedale War Memorial Dedication

Honfleur

Honfleur is in many ways a quaint old town. I liked the contrast with this old (and, to me, Spanish looking) building at the corner of the harbour and the yellow motor bike:-

Old Building, Honfleur

We found this fantastic iron gate (one of a pair obviously) at a side alley:-

Ornate Iron Gates, Honfleur, Normandy, France

The side alley:-

Side Alley, Honfleur

A typical narrow street:-

Typical Narrow Street, Honfleur

But there were some open spaces:-

Tree-lined Square, Honfleur

And it wouldn’t have been complete without a touch of old France. A Clochemerle style outside toilet. (The grey hut behind is an inside toilet):-

toilets

Honfleur, Normandy, France

The final stop on our cruise trip last year was the fishing village of Honfleur in Normandy, France; across the River Seine from Le Havre.

This is a panorama from the ship’s berth on the River Seine.

Honfleur and Port Tower from Ship's Berth

At the extreme right above is one of those modern buildings we seemed to encounter at nearly every port. View from dock:-

Port Tower, Honfleur

View from town side of tower:-

Honfleur, Port Tower from Town Side

Honfleur itself is a delightful village in the old style. Panorama of harbour from the direction of the River Seine:-

Honfleur Harbour

Honfleur harbour from the town:-

Honfleur Harbour From the Town

Harbour buildings:-

Honfleur Harbour, Buildings

Honfleur Harbourside

Lorient’s Art Deco Crown; Chambre de Commerce

This fine Art Deco building in Lorient, Brittany, France was just across a bridge over the inlet of the river, Le Scorff, from the modern Art Deco in the previous post.

Chambre de Commerce de Lorient et du Morbihan:-

Lorient Chaber of Commerce

Close-up of pediment:-

Lorient Chamber of Commerce Pediment

Doorway:-

Lorient Chamber of Commerce Doorway

Corner view:-

Lorient Chamber of Commerce, Corner View

Side view upper detail:-

Lorient Chember of Commerce Side View Upper Detail

View from side street:-

Lorient Chamber of Commerce, Extension?

The nearer doorway in the photo above has Tribunal de Commerce in the stone at the upper level:-

Lorient, Tribunal de Commerce

Lorient, France

Our first cruise stop was in Lorient, Brittany, France. Almost the first thing we saw after making our way out of the port was this piece of Modern Art Deco:-

Modern Art Deco, Lorient

The style continued a bit further along:-

More Modern Deco, Lorient

The same group of buildings from across an inlet of the river, Le Scorff, just beyond where the Black Watch was moored:-

Deco 3

The spire of this church kept catching my eye. It was ages before I found the street it was in. Eglise Notre Dame de Victorie St Louis, rebuilt 1953-5 after bomb damage during the war:-

Eglise Notre Dame de Victorie St Louis

Doorway:-

Doorway, Eglise Notre Dame de Victorie St Louis, Lorient

The Body Shop:-

Deco Style, Lorient

There is a slight Art Deco look, especially the porthole windows in the annexy bit, to this building at Lorient harbour, which from its appearance may date from the Second World War:-

Art Deco? Lorient Harbour

Portugal 0-0 France (1-0 aet)

Euro 2016, Final, Stade de France, 10/7/16.

So. It wasn’t to be Germanic hegemony after all.

Neither was it to be French triumph.

Like a lot of the knockout matches this was a spectacularly dull game but it suggested one thing to me. Portugal are a better team without Cristiano Ronaldo in it than with him. I felt much the same about Liverpool in the latter stages of Steven Gerrard’s time with them. It seemed to me the rest of the Liverpool players were looking too much to Gerrard, giving way to him or allowing him to have the ball when they were in better positions to do something with it. So too with Ronaldo and Portugal. Throughout the tournament (though perhaps not the 3-3 draw with Hungary which I missed as I was watching the Iceland-Austria game) there was something about the way they played with him on the pitch that rendered them less effective as an attacking force. His hogging of all the free kicks with no fruitful result whatsoever was almost laughable. Okay, he did score that header against Wales and scuffed the assist for Nani’s toe-poke in that game but otherwise there was little end product and he seemed to get in the way at times. With him not available others stepped up to the plate – particularly Eder who I doubt would have made it onto the pitch if Ronaldo hadn’t been injured.

Football. It’s a funny old game.

Exit. (England 1-2 Iceland)

Euro 2016, Round of 16, Stade de Nice, 27/6/16.

It’s hard not to think that there’s some sort of karma about this result. After England voting to leave the EU (loosely referred to as Europe) its football team has just departed Europe unwillingly.

The commentator on ITV called it a humiliation and also used the word embarrassment. The unspoken assumption (though it was all but articulated) was that England should always be beating Iceland.

Well; to anyone who had watched Iceland’s group games this was no surprise. Iceland are supremely well organised, the players know what they’re supposed to be doing and play for the team and each other. They drew with Portugal and group winners Hungary and then beat Austria, well fancied before the tournament began. If that wasn’t sufficient warning as to what to expect what would be? Using words such as embarrassment and humiliation is extremely disrespectful to a group of players who work their socks off and have no little ability. I expect France will also find it hard to break them down in the next round.

Iceland know their limitations and strengths, and play to them; as a team. The same was true of Italy earlier in what was a magnificent team performance against Spain.

In this respect it is also hard to resist the temptation to remark that English football commentators have an inflated idea of the worth of their country’s footballers based on club performances. Just reflect, not one of those players is good enough to play for an overseas team. They appear effective at club level only because they are surrounded by foreign players who make them look good. And the clubs of the league they play in have not made too much of a splash in the so-called Champions League of late. (OK, Liverpool made the final of the Europa League this season but that was mostly due to foreigners, manager included.)

England’s most penetrative player tonight was an 18 year old who was only brought on to the pitch when it was far too late and has in any case not yet had the enthusiasm and any latent talent knocked out of him by unwarranted expectation.

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