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Reelin’ in the Years 176: Run For Home

Just because I’ve been posting about the island from which the band Lindisfarne took its name.

The band had split after their third LP Dingly Dell in 1972 but reformed in 1978. Run For Home was taken from their punningly named comeback album Back and Fourth which featured a photograph of Lindisfarne Castle on its sleeve.

Back and Fourth cover sleeve

This is a Top of the Pops appearance from 1978.

Lindisfarne: Run for Home

Live It Up 70: War Baby

I mentioned before that I saw Tom Robinson play live before he came to wider prominence. He was in a band called Café Society and they were supporting somebody or other at the Apollo in Glasgow.

This is one from Tom’s post-Tom Robinson Band output.

Here’s (a very young looking!) Tom miming to War Baby on Top of the Pops in 1983.

Tom Robinson: War Baby

Something Changed 36: Laid

James formed in the 1980s but didn’t trouble the upper reaches of the UK charts till the 1990s.

This was one of the good lady’s favourites from that time.

James: Laid

Ennio Morricone

Composer Ennie Morricone‘s death this week was well marked. He was one of the few film composers whose name was known to the wider public. All in all he composed scores of, em, scores.

Back in the day my elder brother took a liking to the music from Sergio Leone’s “Dollars” films starring Clint Eastwood (and bought the soundtracks as I recall) so I remember this, which absolutely screams Western film tune, well:-

Theme to A Fistful of Dollars

Morricone’s theme to the third film in the trilogy, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, was turned into a UK number one hit by Hugo Montenegro and his Orchestra.

Later, Morricone’s Chi Mai became the title music to the TV Series The Life and Times of David Lloyd George on the back of which it also found chart success, but only to number 2.

Chi Mai

Ennnio Morricone: 10 /11/1928 – 6/7/2020. So it goes.

Edited to add; I forgot Gabriel’s Oboe composed for the film, The Mission.

SF Bookshelf Travelling for Insane Times (iii)

Another for Judith Reader in the Wilderness‘s meme.

This week, the remainder of my SF hardbacks. Click pictures to enlarge them.

More Ian McDonald, China Miéville, Christopher Priest, Keith Roberts, Kim Stanley Robinson, Robert Silverberg, a book of Art Deco posters which fits in nowhere else.

Science Fiction Hardbacks (iii)

On another shelf entirely, standing next to the above. This contains books by my not so secret SF vice, Harry Turtledove, plus one Gene Wolfe, among others. Above, on its side, is a book containing illustrated Bernie Taupin lyrics for early Elton John songs:-

Science Fiction Hardbacks (iv)

Friday on my Mind 192 and Reelin’ in the Years 175: The In Crowd

I give you two for the price of one this week. (Not that either of them actually costs anything.)

The In Crowd was hit in both these decades, first for Dobie Gray in 1965, then for Brian Ferry in 1974.

Here’s Dobie Gray in a US TV appearance.

Dobie Gray: The In Crowd

Ferry’s treatment of the song is a little different.

Brian Ferry: The In Crowd

Live It Up 69: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

A very unBritish sounding song this. It’s more like US soul music.

This seems to be a live TV performance with an extra section in the middle that wasn’t on the album version.

Deacon Blue: When Will You (Make My Telephone Ring)

Something Changed 35: Kiss From a Rose

A bit of “Hey Nonny Nonny” this week. Not from the middle ages but from 1994.

(The oboe is a wee bit reminiscent of Jethro Tull’s Coronach.)

Seal: Kiss From a Rose

Vera

So, Vera Lynn has died.

I suppose it’s too much to hope that that will mean the Second World War is finally over and will no longer be invoked by those trying to make some spurious point about contempoorary life. It was 75 years ago after all.

Oh, well.

A flavour of this sentiment colours this Pink Floyd Track from The Final Cut.

Pink Floyd: Vera

Perhaps not, then.

Lynn is repeatedly referred to as the Forces’ Sweetheart but I have it on good authority that isn’t quite true – at least for the rank and file. When she was on tour giving concerts she spent most of her time with officers. As a result, more popular among the ordinary soldier was the much lesser heralded Anne Shelton.

Still, print the legend, eh?

But at least Lynn didn’t forget the Fourteenth Army and actually visited Burma.

Most people – not least the BBC – no doubt opted for We’ll Meet Again to mark her passing. This one’s slightly less sentimental.

Vera Lynn: A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

Vera Margaret Lynch (Vera Lynn;) 20/3/1917 – 18/6/2020. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 191: The Sun Goes Down

A bit of psychedelia today. I previously described The Monkees as an unusual source of psychedelia. I would submit this group is equally unlikely.

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich: The Sun Goes Down

For comparison purposes here is the A-side from the same single. In this clip the group is obviously miming. Standard practice for the day, though.

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich: Zabadak

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