Tyne Cot Cemetery (i)

The cemetery is in numbers of burials now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world. It is located 9 km north-east of Ypres (Ieper) town centre, on the Tynecotstraat, a road leading from the Zonnebeekseweg. Its name derives from the nickname (Tyne Cottage) given to a German blockhouse by the Northumberland Fusiliers.

11,962 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery. 8,374 are unidentified. In addition there are four German dead only one of whose identities is known.

Entrance:-

Entrance to Tyne Cot Cemetery

It was said to be the idea of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, to erect the cross above the remains of a German pill box at the centre of the cemetery, a remnant of which was left uncovered by the white stone (centre here):-

Cross of Sacrifice and Blockhouse close

Remnant of pillbox. The inscription reads, “This was the Tyne Cot Blockhouse captured by the Australian Division 4th October 1917:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery, Remnant of Tyne Cottage Blockhouse

A further blockhouse incorporated into the cemetery is surrounded by graves:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery Graves and Remains of Blockhouse

Central area:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery Central Area

Cemetery from North-west corner:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery from North-west Corner

Graves containing the remains of several men:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery, Group Graves

A Jewish grave. It is unusual for a Commonwealth War Grave stone to indicate a religion:-

Tyne Cot Cemetery, Jewish grave

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

free hit counter script