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Kirkliston War Memorial

Kirkliston is a small town in West Lothian. I chanced upon it and its War Memorial, which is situated near the crossroads in the town, when I made a wrong turning exiting Dalmeny one day.

The memorial consists of a stone obelisk surmounted by a stone ball on a square pillar and bases with the square panels containing the dedication and lists of names:-

Kirkliston War Memorial

Dedication, “Erected by public subscription by the inhabitants of Kirkliston, Newbridge and Westerton districts to the memory of officers and men who fell in the Great War, 1914-1919”:-

Kirkliston War Memorial Dedication

Privates’ names for the Great War:-

Kirkliston War Memorial 3

Names of officers and non-commissioned officers from the Great War:-=

Kirkliston War Memorial 5

Names of officers and men from World War 2:-

Kirkliston War Memorial 4

Rhu War Memorial

Rhu is a village on the north bank of the River Clyde by the Gare Loch in Argyll and Bute. Its War Memorial stands in front of the churchyard, beautifully situated overlooking the entrance to the Gare Loch.

The inscription reads, “To the glory of God and in memory of the men from this parish who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great War 1914-1918. And of those who fell in the war 1939-1945,” followed by World War 2 names. “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” Rhu Parish Church behind:-

Rhu War Memorial

Rhu War Memorial from the churchyard, Gare Loch behind:-

Rhu War Memorial from Churchyard

Rhu War Memorial from East. Names here are for the Great War:-

Rhu War Memorial from East

From west. Again the names are for the Great War:-

Rhu War Memorial from West

Jedburgh War Memorial

A cenotaph on a raised stone platform surrounded by a stone balustrade.

Jedburgh War Memorial, Full View

Close view. Great War names on these panels:-

Jedburgh War Memorial Close View

Showing east and south Great War plaques:-

Jedburgh War Memorial Closer View

From below steps. The facing lower plaque reads, “They died for their country 1914-1919.” Plaques to left and right list names for World War 2. (Jedburgh Abbey to left in background):-

Jedburgh War Memorial

World War 2 names:-

Jedburgh War Memorial Plaque 2

Jedburgh War Memorial Plaque

More Liverpool War Memorials

There is a cluster of memorials on the riverfront of the Mersey in Liverpool – all relating to World War 2.

The SS Arandora Star was torpedoed west of Donegal on 2/7/1940. Over 800 drowned:-

Arandora Star Memorial, Liverpool

HMT Lancastria was sunk off St Nazaire 17/6/1940 while evacuating British servicemen and civilans. Up to 6,000 people lost their lives:-

HMT Lancastria Memorial, Liverpool

Memorial to ranks and ratings who died on shore with no known grave:-

On Shore Navy Casualties Memorial. Liverpool

Repatriation Memorial, commemorating the return of Far East prisoners of war and detainees:-

Repatriation Memorial, Liverpool

Merchant Navy Memorial, Liverpool

“Dedicated to the men and women who gave their lives willingly for the freedom of others and have no grave but the sea,” followed by,
“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them”:-

Merchant Navy Memorial, Liverpool

Reverse view. “1914-1918 and all 1939-1945.”
“This memorial dedicated to the Merchant Navy was donated to the people of Liverpool by the Liverpool Retired Merchant Seafarers and handed to the city by the Rt Honourable John Prescott Deputy Prime Minister 30th October 1998”:-

Reverse of Merchant Navy Memorial, Liverpool

Cunard Building in background.

No Grave but the Sea, Liverpool, Naval War Memorial

By the River Mersey, Liverpool, lies this memorial to Merchant Navy personnel who died serving in the Royal Navy and have no known grave. The names are engraved on the brass panels:-

Liverpool, Naval War Memorial

Central pedestal:-

Central Pedestal, Liverpool Naval War Memorial

Inscription. “These officers and men of the merchant navy died while serving with the Royal Navy and have no grave but the sea. 1939-1945”:-

Inscription, Liverpool Naval War Memorial

Reverse view:-

Reverse View, Liverpool Naval War Memorial

Cunard War Memorial, Liverpool

On the west side of the Cunard Building in Liverpool lies this Memorial dedicated to Cunard employees who died in the Great War and World War 2. A figure of Victory atop a column with a depiction of a boat extending either side of the column halfway up. “Pro Patria 1914-1918, 1939-1945”:-

Cunard War Memorial, Liverpool

Busy Day

I had a busy day yesterday.

Firstly I had the great honour of laying a wreath on behalf of the Community Council at the local War Memorial.

Then in the afternoon it was off to Cellardyke (where we have not-quite-yet relatives) for the Quiet Citizen’s Walk round the town past the houses of the fallen from the Great War poutsid eof which present residents were standing before joining the procession.

The walk ended up at Cellardyke Town Hall where a short talk was given on Cellardyke’s war dead. Unlike in the rest of the country most fishing town’s servicemen enlisted – or were conscripted into in the navy, their boats converted to minesweeping and anti-submarine duties and many sunk as a consequence. So it was with Cellardyke.

Actor Clive Russell who loives in the town recited Ewart Alan Mackintosh’s poem In Memoriam.

Then, in what was a moving detail, a succession of townsfolk who had been allocated a dog-tag with the name one of the dead came on to the stage to give the name and surrender the dog-tag to a total of 62.

There followed another walk to the Cellardyke (Kilrenny) War Memorial for the laying of wreaths and a piper’s lament.

Is it just me being Scottish or is there something more universal about the fittingness of the sound of the bagpipes played in memoriam?

Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres (Ieper,) Flanders

Essex Farm Cemetery is located on the banks of the Ypres-Yser canal by the site of the Advanced Dressing Station where Lt Col John McCrae was serving as a medical officer when he wrote his famous poem “In Flanders Fields.” I have blogged about him previously in connection with the McCrae Memorial at Eilean Donan Castle in Lochalsh, Scotland.

The cemetery contains more than 1,000 graves. Unusually for a Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery its Cross of Sacrifice is located right at the entrance:-

Essex Farm Cemetery Ypres, Cross of Sacrifice

Graves from northwest:-

Graves at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

From southeast. Note Yorkshire Memorial on the canal bank:-

More Graves at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

From northeast:-

Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres, Graves

From south. Again note Yorkshire Memorial (which I shall come back to):-

Graves at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Graves from Yorkshire Memorial:-

View of Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Graves from north, Yorkshire Memorial to left:-

Graves at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

A tree trunk has grown round the gravestone of Private J MacPherson, Seaforth Highlanders, who died on 5/7/1917, aged 33:-

Commonwealth War Grave, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Symbolic of the fact they fought and died over the same ground the cemetery holds a German grave, Franz Heger, RIR, 238, 7/8/1916:-

German Grave, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Grave of Rifleman V J Strudwick, The Rifle Brigade, 14/1/1916, aged 15, said to be the youngest British Empire casualty of the Great War. (There may be some doubt about this.) It is nevertheless a focus for remembrance:-

Youngest Casualty, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

John McCrae Commemoration stone. Written in four languages, French, Flemish, English and German, with the poem itself also inscribed on the memorial along with a facsimile of the handwritten manuscript:-

John McCrae Commemoration, Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

The bunkers at Essex Farm Cemetery where John McCrae worked as a medic:-

Bunkers at  Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Bunker interior:-

Interior of Bunker at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Another bunker interior:-

Another Bunker at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Bunkers, looking back up to Essex Farm Cemetery grounds:-

Bunkers at Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Information board with a photograph of how the bunkers appeared during the war:-

Information Board Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres

Lest We Forget:-

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Wilfred Owen

One hundred years ago today, only one week before the armistice which ened the Great War, perhaps the most resonant of that war’s poets, Wilfred Owen, was killed leading his troops across the Sambre–Oise Canal.

Wilfred Owen

On my trip down to Oswestry for the Challenge Cup semi-final in February I discovered his name is on the Great War Memorial inside Shrewsbury Abbey.

The Abbey:-

Shrewsbury Abbey

The War Memorial. Owen’s name is marked by a poppy:-

Shrewsbury Abbey War Memorial

Closer View:-

Shrewsbury Abbey War Memorial Detail

In the Abbey grounds there is a memorial dedicted to Owen. The text in red this side reads, “Wilfred Owen Poet 18/3/1893-4/11/1918.”:-

Wilfred Owen Memorial, Shrewsbury Abbey Grounds.

The memorial is titled “Symmetry” and was designed by Paul De Monchaux and erected in 1993:-

Wilfred Owen Memorial Title

Three other information stones surround the memorial. Birth and life:-

Wilfred Owen Memorial Information Plaque

Death:-

Wilfred Owen Memorial Plaque

Line of Poem:-

Wilfred Owen  Memorial Explanation

The memorial is in the form of a pontoon bridge. You can read more about it here.

The red writing on this side is the quote (line 40 of “Strange Meeting“) “I am the enemy you killed my friend.”

Wilfred Owen Memorial Reverse View

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