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Chinese Room, Willow Tea Rooms, Buchanan Street, Glasgow

One of Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s designs for Miss Cranston’s Tea Rooms.

I featured the exterior and lower tea room with one photograph of the Chinese Room here.

Mackintosh chair halfway up stair to Chinese Room:-

C.R. Mackintosh chair

View of Chinese Room from stairs:-

Chinese Tearoom

Alcove above stairs:-

The Willow Rearooms alcove

View from above stairs:-

Chinese Room, Willow Tea Rooms, Buchanan Street, Glasgow

View back to stairs:-

Chinese Room, Willow Tea Rooms, Buchanan Street, Glasgow

Mackintosh print, tea-room tables, menu and chairs:-

Chinese Tearoom

Demi-lune chair opposite till:-

Willow Tea Rooms Demi-lune Chair

Not the Chinese Room:-

Willow Tea Rooms Chairs

Charles Rennie Mackintosh Designed Oak Room at V&A Dundee

This Oak Room was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for Miss Cranston’s Tea Rooms, Ingram Street, Glasgow.

After those tea rooms closed for business the room was for many years stored by Glasgow Corporation and then Glasgow Museums.

The construction of the V&A Dundee provided a space for the rooms to be on show to the public once more.

Mackintosh's Oak Room at V&A Dundee

Oak Room, V&A Dundee

Fireplace, Oak Room, V&A Dundee

V&A Dundee, Oak Room by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Charles Rennie Mackintosh Oak Room, V&A Dundee

Windows, Oak Room, V&A Dundee

Sneek (ii)

Dutch towns have interesting architectural features. Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether a building is Art Deco or not. Others are distinctively Dutch/Low Countries as on the right here:-

Buildings in Sneek, The Netherlands

The doorway to the middle building above has Art Deco features to it. Certainly there’s “rule of three” in the windows above it and the door itself has a very 30s feel. The ironwork on the gates is good too:-

Art Deco Doorway, Sneek, The Netherlands,

The brickwork on the canalside house below is very distinctive and there’s more than a hint of Deco to the double doors in the centre. Also a Charles Rennie Mackintosh feel to all the doors:-

Decorative Brickwork, Sneek, The Netherlands

And is this Deco or merely Dutch style?:-

Deco Style? Sneek, The Netherlands

Note the squares in the window highlights. And there’s an Art Nouveau touch to the decoration just above the windows but below the brick arches:-

Deco Detail, Sneek, The Netherlands

Charles Rennie Mackintosh Building

In an item on today’s Reporting Scotland on BBC 1 Scotland I immediately recognised this building:-

Helensburgh Shop Building

I had posted about it here.

It seems this is one of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s designs and the building has now been refurbished and it is intended to turn it into an art gallery.

Tonight’s episode featuring the building will be available for a short time only on the iPlayer here.

Willow Tea Rooms, Buchanan Street, Glasgow

I thought I’d posted this photo (taken in December 2014) of the exterior of the Charles Rennie Mackintosh designed Willow Tea Rooms in Buchanan Street, Glasgow, but searching the blog gave no results so perhaps I didn’t.

Willow tea rooms

The tea rooms were I believe defunct for a while but have been refurbished. In April this year the good lady and I partook of the facilities within. Lovely lunch, reasonably priced.

Rennie Mackintosh style chairs:-

Willow Tea Rooms Interior 1

A banquette:-

Willow Tea Rooms 2

Interior panelling. Typical Mackintosh motifs:-

Willow Tea Rooms 3

More panelling:-

Willow Tea Rooms 4

Window blind. Signature Mackintosh lettering:-

Willow Tea Rooms 5

Table accoutrements (sadly not quite in focus):-

Willow Tea Rooms 6

Lampshade:-

Willow Tea Rooms 7

Blue and purple lampshades (again sadly not focused):-

Willow Tea Rooms 8

There are two tearooms inside. This is on the stair up to the Chinese Room:-

Willow Tea Rooms 9

The Chinese Room itself. Note the chairbacks:-

Willow Tea Rooms 10

Lower stairwell. Again thoroughly Mackintosh lampshades and banisters:-

Willow Tea Rooms 11

Helensburgh Architecture

I was over in the west in April (for the Queen of the South game I think) and took in Helensburgh again.

This shop (in Sinclair Street?) has very minor Art Deco touches:-

Decoish Shop Frontage Helensburgh

Detail of windows to right:-

Helensburgh, Decoish Frontage 2

This building (definitely in Sinclair Street) is impressive in its upper reaches:-

Helensburgh Shop Building

Roofline detail:-

Helensburgh Shop Close-up

This cartouche looks like it may be a representation of St Andrew:-

Helensburgh Shop Detail

Edited to add:- I have since discoverd this is one of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s designs.

Glasgow’s Art Deco Heritage 9: Argyle Street. Addendum

This one’s in the east end of the city centre part of Argyle Street. I missed it last December but got a photo early last month. Superstructure and windows. Nice scrolling on the stonework and lovely stained glass but needing cleaned up methinks:-

Art Deco in Argyle Street, Glasgow

Pity it’s so dilapidated. Close-up on the windows:-

Art Deco, Argyle Street, Glasgow, Detail

At the bottom of Buchanan Street and on the corner of Argyle Street and St Enoch Square is what used to be Arnotts department store and is now a branch of Bank of Scotland.

Art Deco Bank, Argyle Street, Glasgow

Below is the Argyle Street elevation of HSBC. For Buchanan Street elevations see here.

HSBC, Argyle Street, Glasgow

Under the Hielanman’s Umbrella is this entrance to Glasgow Central Station:-

Glasgow Central Station, Argyle Street Entrance

There is a similar entrance on the south side of the street. (Stitch of two photos.)

Other Entrance, Glasgow Central Station

Below is the Argyle Street frontage of the Mackintoshed up building whose Union Street aspect I featured here. Again a stitch of two.

Mackintosh Style in Argyle Street, Glasgow

Glasgow’s Art Deco Heritage 13: Union Street

Art Deco style shop in Union Street, Glasgow:-

Detailing round the windows:-

The roofline has good touches:-

On the corner of Union and Argyle Streets lay the location of the famous meeting place known as “Boots’ corner” but Boots is long gone and this Union Street facade has now had “Mackintosh” embellishments added. Mockintosh, if you like:-

The detailing has typical Mackintosh square elements with sinuous biologically inspired lines:-

As do the window surrounds with the addition of also typical elongated rectangles:-

The elongated rectangles and sinuous lines are prominent in the bay window too:-

I can’t remember exactly which street this was in but it’s a fine building too, with hints of deco:-

Glasgow School of Art

I was devastated to hear today of the fire at Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s masterpiece building, the Glasgow School of Art. (For pictures of the undamaged building see here.)

I have featured another of his buildings, Scotland Street School, here.

I have also visited the House for an Art Lover, built to Mackintosh designs in Glasgow’s Bellahouston Park (on part of the site of the Empire Exhibition, Scotland, 1938,) and Hill House in Helensburgh as well as the Mackintosh House at the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery at the University of Glasgow but all without benefit a modern camera. All are visually stunning.

I must confess to being a teeny bit annoyed when Lorna Gordon, BBC London’s Scotland correspondent, called the Art School an Art Deco building. None of Mackintosh’s buildings are Deco. They are leaning towards it, certainly, but really have more in common with Art Nouveau. At a pinch you could say they act as a bridge between the two styles. While some Mackintosh designs have the blend of horizontal and vertical that is a signifier of Art Deco he also had a strong liking for curves which grew firmly from the Art Nouveau tradition of evoking nature and natural forms.

I assume the plans for the School of Art are still in existence somewhere – and that there is insurance in place. Even if it is costly it is to be hoped that some sort of effort at restoration can be made to the Art School. The result may not be original but so few of Mackintosh’s designs were erected in his lifetime it would be tantamount to a crime to allow to disappear the outstanding example that was.

In the meantime, not just Glasgow, not only Scotland, but the world, is a poorer place to live in tonight.

Scotland’s Art Deco Heritage 30: Musselburgh

Musselburgh has at least three Art Deco buildings.

This is the David Macbeth Moir pub on Bridge Street, a Wetherspoon’s. (David Macbeth Moir is a historical local worthy.)

The David Macbeth Moir, Musselburgh,, Left view

The building was formerly the Hayweights cinema. Its detailing and lettering is now after Charles Rennie Mackintosh – Mockintosh, then.

The David Macbeth Moir, Musselburgh 2

Further up Bridge Street is The Royal Bank of Scotland building. That window covered with wooden board is a bit worrying!

Royal Bank of Scotland Building, Musselburgh

On High Street, almost opposite the War Memorial, can be found Poundland. The High Street was busy – difficult to get a photo without traffic.

Poundland, Musselburgh, from High Street

Poundland, Musselburgh from Bridge Street

More of my Musselburgh photos are on my flickr.

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