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Reelin’ in the Years 193 – Georgina Bailey

A piece of slightly risqué pop. The clip has Noosha Fox dressed as a schoolgirl singing a song about a woman who falls for her uncle. But in any case he’s gay.

On Top of the Pops this was introduced by a now infamous sexual predator.

That will be why this clip starts so abruptly; as he’s been cut out of it.

Noosha Fox: Georgina Bailey

Reelin’ in the Years 192 – Make It With You

I mentioned here that David Gates of Bread somehow managed to write love songs that just hit the spot.

From 1970, this was the group’s first UK hit.

Bread: Make It With You

Reelin’ in the Years 188: In My Own Time

You can’t mistake vocalist Roger Chapman’s distinctive voice. A Family signature.

Family: In My Own Time

Reelin’ in the Years 172: Wuthering Heights

This was the song that introduced Kate Bush to the world.

And over forty years later I finally got round to reading the book which inspired it.

Kate Bush: Wuthering Heights

Reelin’ in the Years 171: Ain’t No Sunshine. RIP Bill Withers

Another 1970s songwriter gone.

Writing a love song, or at least a good love song, is a difficult trick to pull off. That Bill Withers managed to tread the line between enuine feeling and mawkish sentimentality on the right side speaks of his talent.

He had very few hits but the songs for which he’ll be remembered in the UK, Lean on Me, Just the Two of Us, Lovely Day and Ain’t No Sunshine, do just that. Lovely Day is one of the few examples of a feel-good song that is pitch perfect.

The last of those four seems more appropriate to mark his passing though.

Bill Withers: Ain’t No Sunshine

William Harrison (Bill) Withers: July 4/7/1938 – March 30/3/2020. So it goes.

Reelin’ In the Years 165: Do Anything You Wanna Do

The lead singer of Eddie and the Hot Rods died suddenly earlier this month. The Rods were a kind of precursor punk band more or less superseded by the likes of the Sex Pistols when they came along. Their brief heyday was in 1977 when this song – released under the name The Rods – became their biggest hit.

The Rods: Do Anything You Wanna Do

Barrie Masters: 4/5/1956 – 2/10/2019. So it goes.

Reelin’ In the Years 157: That’s The Way

A couple of weeks ago I featured a song with this title. It’s not the first one that would have come to my mind when I thought of it.

That would be the following, side 2, track 3 on the album Led Zeppelin III, from 1970.

Led Zeppelin: That’s The Way

Reelin’ In the Years 118: All Around My Hat

Here’s that song containing the phrase “a twelvemonth and a day” which I mentioned a couple of posts ago.

Produced by Mike Batt this is Steeleye Span’s folk rock* take on a traditional 19th century song apparently interpolated with lyrics from another song from the same era, Farewell He.

Steeleye Span: All Around My Hat

*Wikipedia seems to differentiate folk rock from electric folk.

Ring in the New. (Reelin’ In the Years 115: Ding Dong, Ding Dong)

A bit of festive cheer for the coming of 2016.

After all, 2015 wasn’t so hot was it?

Happy New Year everybody.

George Harrison: Ding Dong, Ding Dong

Reelin’ In the Years 114: California Man

The roots of both ELO and Wizzard are evident in this, the last of the hits by Birmingham band The Move, which by this time had lost original members Carl Wayne, Ace Kefford and Trevor Burton and reeled in Jeff Lynne from The Idle Race. ELO’s first single 10538 Overture was released only a month or so after this.

The Move: California Man

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