Archives » Trips

Great War Exhibits at Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park near Milton Keynes (very near) is famous for the codebreaking efforts of its occupants during World War 2.

As a museum though it is so much more. It is one of the best I have ever visited. We spent nearly the whole day there.

And it is not devoted merely to the breaking of the Enigma (and related) WW2 codes.

The recommended route through on our (Covid distanced) trip took us first into the section covering Bletchley Park’s Great War predecessor – the famous Admiralty Room 40.

An amusing exhibit was this one of a magazine Room 40’s denizens produced for themselves to document their activities:-

Alice Magazine, Bletchley Park

Room 40’s workers were the “brightest and best”:-

The Right People

This exhibit lists the members of Room 40 who went on to the Government Code and Cypher School, Bletchley Park’s predecessor:-

Intelligence Roll, Room 40

I also liked the cover of this book on the Battle of Jutland:-

Jutland Book Cover, Bletchley Park

These document the German Naval bombardment of Scarborough:-

Great War German Attack on Scarborough

Scarborough Attack Memorabilia, Bletchley Park

The German Raid on Scarborough

Room 40’s greatest achievement was the decoding of the Zimmerman Telegram:-

Zimmerman Telegram

Its contents, with its invitation to Mexico to invade the US and promise to reward it with US territory, were the major reason the US entered the war against Germany.

Decoded Zimmerman Telegram

Art Deco Style at Bletchley Park

A lot of the buildings used during the Second World War in Britain had elements of deco style. Not surprisingly, the era had not really passed when the war began.

So it wasn’t entirely unexpected that when I rolled up at the car park at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, home of the WW2 British code-breaking effort, last September, the first buildings I saw were in that flat-roofed, Critall-windowed mode.

Buildings by car park. These are the sorts of things you see at former WW2 airfields:-

Wartime Buildings? Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park, External Building

This submarine model beside the road from the car park to Bletchley Park presumably commemorates the code-breakers’ role in winning the Atlantic war:-

Submarine Model, Bletchley Park

This is a more modern building in that wartime style but I don’t think it’s part of Bletchley Park:-

External Building, Bletchley Park

These modernised ones were all inside the Bletchley Park museum site:-

Bletchley Park Building

Modernised Building, Bletchley Park

Modernised Wartime Buildings, Bletchley Park,

One of the internal exhibits was this photograph of the impeccably Art Deco Hollerith Factory where the calculating machines known as Bombes, which tried out the variations of the intercepted Enigma messages to get a code match were manufactured:-

Art Deco Hollerith Factory Photograph, Bletchley Park,

Hollerith building and interior:-

Hollerith Factory and Interior

Luss War Memorial

I posted about Luss a couple of days ago.

Its War Memorial lies in a small enclosure beside Pier Road. It is a simple stone cross with embossed sword atop a hexagonal pedestal.
The dedication reads, “In grateful memory of the men of this parish who gave their lives in the Great War 1914-19,” with added below, “and in the war 1939-1945.” Second World War names lie after the ‘and’ of the World War 2 dedication, Great War names are on the two hexagonal sides flanking it.

Luss War Memorial

From west. Great War names on facing side of hexagon:-

War Memorial, Luss

From east. Great War names on facing side of hexagon:-

Luss War Memorial from East

Luss

Luss is a village on the shores of Loch Lomond in the west of Scotland. It’s about twelve or so miles from Dumbarton.

It was the village where most of the outside shots for the Scottish Television (STV) soap opera Take the High Road were filmed.

Luss from the village pier:-

Luss, from Loch Lomond,

Part of Luss from the other side of the pier:-

Luss From Loch Lomond

Luss Church:-

Luss Church, Loch Lomond, Dunbartonshire, Scotland

In the churchyard there is a Viking hogback stone:-

Viking hogback stone, grave, Luss, Loch Lomond

Just up from the church there is this curious bridge which seems to cross a small inlet of Loch Lomond:-

Loch Lomond, Bridge,Church

Loch Lomond Bridge, Luss

near Loch Lomond, Luss, Scotland, trees

In the village itself there’s this cottage with (shallow) cat slide dormer windows:-

Cat Slide Cottage, Luss, Scotland

The Loch Lomond Arms is at the top of the road down to the pier:-

Loch Lomond Arms, Luss

Stonehaven and Dunnottar War Memorial (iv) – World War 2

The names of some World War 2 fields of miltary operations are inscribed on the base of the pillars supprtoing the lintels of Stonehaven War Memorial.

“North Atlantic, Narvik”

Stonehaven War Memorial Second World War Stone

“Dunkirk, Battle of Britain”

Second World War Stone, Stonehaven War Memorial

“El Alamein, Cassino”

War Memorial, Stonehaven, Second World War Stone

“Normandy Beaches, Burma”

Second World War Stone, War Memoria, Stonehaven

The World War 2 dead are commemorated in a series of four granite panels sitting by the Memorial’s pillars. The first is also inscribed with the dedication, “To the memory of those from the District of Stonehaven whose names are inscribed on these panels who lost their lives in the World War 1939 -1945,” as well as the names.

J Fraser Anderson – John Christie:-

Stonehaven War Memorial World War 2 Dedication and Names

William J Christie – James Mc I Findlay:-

Second World War Names, Stonehaven War Memorials

Robert T Foster – George Masson:-

Stonehaven War Memorial, World War 2 Names

William Masson – Alexander R Williamson:-

Second World War Names, Stonehaven War Memorial

Stonehaven and Dunnottar War Memorial (iii) – The Great War

The names of the Great War dead at Stonehaven War Memorial are inscribed on stone panels at the memorial’s centre.

James Adams – Frank Dallas:-

Great War Names, War Memorial, Stonehaven,

David Duncan – John Lennox:-

Stonehaven War Memorial, Great War Names

John Main – James Simpson:-

War Memorial, Stonehaven, Great War Names

James Sinclair – Alex W Youngson:-

First World War Names, War Memorial, Stonehaven.

Stonehaven and Dunnottar War Memorial (ii)

Stonehaven War Memorial interior:-

Wreaths and panel with Great War names, some World War 2 names on smaller panels behind:-

Wreaths and Panel with Great War Names, War Memorial, Stonehaven

The interior of the lintel above the entrance is inscribed, “Erected by the people of Stonehaven and District. A tribute to their dead, 1914 – 1919”:-

Great War Dedication, Stonehaven War Memorial

The other interior lintels of the temple-like memorial are inscribed with the quote, from Donald Hankey‘s A Student in Arms, “One by one death challenged them, one by one they smiled in his grim visage and refused to be dismayed”:-

Part of Lintel Inscription Stonehaven War Memorial

Part of Lintel Inscription, Stonehaven War Memorial

Part of Lintel Inscription, Stonehaven War Memorials

Stonehaven and Dunnottar War Memorial (i)

Stonehaven War Memorial sits prominently on Black Hill to the south of the town and is also visible from Dunnottar Castle. The winding path from the castle takes you towards Stonehaven and partly up Black Hill from where you can access the Memorial grounds.

View of Memorial from path leading from Dunnittar Castle:-

Stonehaven War Memorial from South

Stonehaven from Stonehaven War Memorial:-

Stonehaven from Stonehaven War Memorial

Memorial from west as seen from the road back to Dunnottar Castle:-

Stonehaven War Memorial from West

An information board says the memorial was deliberately designed to look like a ruin to symbolise the lives cut short by the Great War:-

Information Board, Stonehaven War Memorial

Stonehaven War Memorial from north:-

War Memorial, Stonehaven

The external lintels are inscribed with the names of Great War battles, here Jutland, Mons, Ypres:-

Stonehaven War Memorial

From south, Zeebrugge, Gallipoli, Jutland:-

War Memorial, Stonehaven

From southwest, Marne, Zeebrugge:-

Stonehaven War Memorial

From west, Vimy, Somme, Marne:-

War Memorial, Stonehaven

From northwest, Mons, Ypres:-

War Memorial Stonehaven

Dunnottar Castle (iv) – Surroundings

Waterfall by Dunnottar Castle from approach path:-

Waterfall by Dunnottar Castle

Cliffs to south from approach path:-

Cliffs from Path near Dunnottar Castle

Rocks below Dunnottar Castle:-

Dunnottar  Castle rocks

Cliffs to north and sea inlet, from Dunnottar Castle, Stonehaven War Memorial on hilltop:-

Cliffs and Sea Inlet from Dunnottar Castle

Stonehaven War Memorial on hill:-

War Memorial from Dunnottar Castle Castle

After our visit to Dunnottar Castle we took a footpath which (eventually) leads to Stonehaven. This afforded more views of the northern cliffs:-

Cliff View  from Dunnottar path

And of the Castle looking back:-

Dunnottar Castle, From Path to Stonehaven

Dunnottar Castle, from North

Dunnottar Castle view

Northern cliffs again:-

Dunnottar Castle, cliffs, Aberdeenshire

Dunnottar Castle (iii)

Cistern in courtyard. This ensured the castle’s water supply:-

Cistern, Dunnottar Castle

Cistern from upper floor of main building:-

Dunnottar Castle Cistern from Upper Floor

Interior (with windows):-

Interior, Dunnottar Castle

Window seat:-

Dunnottar Castle  windowseat

View from a window:-

Window, Dunnottar Castle,

Sundial and Lintel:-

Dunnottar Castle, Sundial and Lintel

Sundial and coat of arms information board:-

Dunnottar Castle, Sundial and Coat of Arms

Fireplace. Inscribed, “In commemoration of the defence of the honours of Scotland Sep 1651 – Aug 1652 by George Ogilvy of Barras, Governor of Dunnottar and of the help given by his wife Elizabeth Douglas and her kinswoman Anne Lindsay.” Scroll down for the story.

Dunnottar Castle chair + Fireplace

Part of Restored Ceiling (Regi et Regno):-

Part of Restored Ceiling, Dunnottar Castle

Restored ceiling (In Defens):-

Dunnottar Castle  restored ceiling 1

free hit counter script