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Art Deco in Liverpool (vi) Modern Deco

This is clearly not a building from the 1920 or 1930s but it definitely has Deco style much like the MI5/MI6 building in London or the UCAS building in Cheltenham.

A Modern Art Deco Building, Liverpool

Not So Traditional Architecture, Liverpool

There is some modern architecture in Liverpool, especially the Museum of Liverpool, situated down towards the Mersey.

Museum (centre left) from Albert Dock:-

Museum of Liverpool from Albert Dock

From plaza:-

Museum of Liverpool

Closer view:-

Museum of Liverpool Closer View

A very Chinese looking construction across a street entrance in Liverpool:-

Chinese Pagoda, Liverpool

A bit more traditional. Decorative tiles on a city centre building:-

Decorative Tiles, Liverpool

Ocean Liners Exhibition, V&A, Dundee

We visited the new V&A, Dundee, last week where the first exhibition was on Ocean Liners, with the sub-heading Speed and Style:-

Poster For Ocean Liners Exhibition, V&A, Dundee

Exhibition Poster, V&A entrance behind:-

Ocean Liners Exhibition Poster & V&A, Dundee

This post only scratches the surface of what is a sumptuous exhibition which is mainly a feast of Art Deco style reflecting the ocean liner’s inter-wars heyday.

Brochure for French shipping line:-

Shipping Line Brochure, Ocean Liners Exhibition, V&A, Dundee

United States Lines Brochure:-

United States Lines Brochure,  Ocean Liners Exhibition, V&A, Dundee

It’s not exclusively Art Deco, though. This is a Louis XIV style door from a pre World War 1 French liner:-

Loius XIV Door. Ocean Liners Exhibition, V&A, Dundee

A similar Louis XIV style panel and chair:-

Loius XIV Door Panel and Chair

Wall panel from one of the Titanic’s sister ships, SS Olympic:-

Wall Panel from SS Olympic

The ultimate in streamlined ship design. Perhaps it was fortunate this was never built. Everything’s enclosed, there’s no deck where you could take the air. (It also looks a bit like a submarine):-

Streamlined Ship Model

The V&A, Dundee

The new branch of the V&A Museum in Dundee, a museum of Scottish design and its impact on and from the world, opened to visitors today.

As we quite often visit or pass through Dundee this is a building I have seen growing from the waterfront over the past few years and it is a splendid piece of architecture.

It lies beside Discovery Point, latest (and last?) home of Scott’s and Shackleton’s research ship the RRS Discovery. There are hopes the V&A will do for Dundee in terms of tourism and raising the city’s profile what the Guggenheim did for Bilbao.

It’s exciting to think I’ll be able to visit it soon. We’re not going straight away as we expect it will be fairly busy. I believe entrance has to be booked for the first few weeks.

These photos were taken in February when the building was pretty well completed on the outside. We had been round the Discovery – itself well worth a visit – and the opportunity to take the photographs couldn’t be missed.

RRS Discovery and V&A Dundee:-

RRS Discovery and New V&A Dundee

Part of the V&A looks like the prow of a ship. V&A from the stern of RSS Discovery (Tay Road Bridge in background):-

V&A Dundee from RRS Discovery

Stern sprit of RSS Discovery, V&A in background:-

Stern Sprit of RRS Discovery, V&A in background

In other aspects it resembles a cliff, the architect Kengo Kuma‘s inspiration. V&A from RRS Discovery:-

V&A Dundee from RRS Discovery

From plaza:-

V&A Dundee from Plaza

From east northeast:-

V&A Dundee from Northeast

The inside exhibits promise to be as distinctive as the outside.

Buildings in Drachten

A few buildings in Drachten I missed first time round.

Art Deco style brickwork on this:-

Art Deco Brickwork, Drachten

Typical old Dutch style:-

Dutch Style Building, Drachten

Modern bungalow type house but flat-roofed:-

House and Trees, Drachten

Another more modern style house:-

Modern Style House, Drachten

I also spotted this neat multi-child trolley being trundlied across the town square:-

Baby Trolley, Drachten, The Netherlands

Sneek (i)

There’s something satisfying about a town which has water in or near its centre. It nearly always brightens the place up.

Sneek (it’s pronounced snake) is a town in Friesland, in the north of The Netherlands.

Like a lot of towns in Flanders and most in The Netherlands, Sneek is built around canals. This one was right beside the road leading into the town from the motorway. The town centre is just off to the right.

Canal in Sneek,  Friesland

We parked by the side of this (different) canal:-

Canal

That was after having crossed this bridge to get to the canalside:-

Canal Bridge

And this canal is in the middle of a shopping street. Notice the “Christmas Light” style hangings over the canal:-

Canal in Sneek

Along with more standard light fittings these also appeared over the “normal” streets:-

Street in Sneek

The design is in the shape of the Waterpoort, a prominent feature of Sneek’s townscape which I’ll post about later.

This is another beautiful, leafy canal in Sneek:-

Canal

A bit further along the same canal was this striking modern theatre:-

Sneek Theatre

Woolworth’s British Shop Fronts

Thanks to Duncan for this one.

A short history with photographs of British Woolworth’s shop fronts, whose heyday was of course in the Art Deco 1930s.

As Duncan says, an old Woolies is almost instantly recognisable.

Architecture in Wick, Sutherland, Scotland

On the way up to Orkney in June (posts, passim) we had time to stop off in Wick, Sutherland.

It has some Art Deco buildings! (Well, styling anyway.)

Bank of Scotland:-

Bank of Scotland Building, Wick, Sutherland

Detail:-

Art Deco Detail, Bank of Scotland, Wick

Minor deco style in De Vita’s:-

De Vita's, Wick

Another Bank. The TSB:-

TSB, Wick

A more modern building. It looked as if it was unfinished inside:-

Modern Building, Wick

Wick’s Wetherspoon’s is more traditional in construction:-

The Alexander Bain, Wick

Wetherspoon’s usually names its pubs after a local person of repute. This plaque on a wall round the corner told of Bain’s accomplishments:-

Alexander Bain Plaque, Wick

Honfleur, Normandy, France

The final stop on our cruise trip last year was the fishing village of Honfleur in Normandy, France; across the River Seine from Le Havre.

This is a panorama from the ship’s berth on the River Seine.

Honfleur and Port Tower from Ship's Berth

At the extreme right above is one of those modern buildings we seemed to encounter at nearly every port. View from dock:-

Port Tower, Honfleur

View from town side of tower:-

Honfleur, Port Tower from Town Side

Honfleur itself is a delightful village in the old style. Panorama of harbour from the direction of the River Seine:-

Honfleur Harbour

Honfleur harbour from the town:-

Honfleur Harbour From the Town

Harbour buildings:-

Honfleur Harbour, Buildings

Honfleur Harbourside

Art Deco in Bruges

There isn’t much Art Deco in the centre of Bruges, of course, but in the approach to Smedenpoort we saw this. Good rounded balconies and column, porthole windows:-

Art Deco Style, Bruges

And that building to the left has an interesting feature – a gold figure of a seated man:-

Gold Seated Man, Bruges

This one was a bit nearer to Smedenpoort. Rounded balcony, pillar, rule of three in windows, projecting canopy:-

Bruges, Art Deco Style Again

This doorway was striking:-

Art Deco Door, Bruges

I photographed this pair on the way back to the car. Note canopy over central bay on the one to the left:-

Art Deco, Bruges

It had a good doorway too:-

Another Deco Door, Bruges

And that greyer one had strong banding and a projection from its roofline. Pity its eyes have been “poked out”:-

Art Deco in Bruges

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