Archives » War Memorials

Thomas Telford’s Bridge at Invermoriston

Invermoriston lies near Loch Ness, in the Highlands, 7 miles from the loch’s foot at Fort Augustus.

Apart from some Highland cows in a field by the car park and its War Memorial (which I featured here) its most interesting feature is the bridge built by engineer Thomas Telford in 1813.

The bridge was superseded by a new one in the 1930s and its approaches are now in considerable disrepair:-

Thomas Telford's Bridge at Invermoriston

This is taken from off to the right of the one above:-

Arch of Thomas Telford's Bridge, Invermoriston

Viewing it from down on the river from the other side of the bridge reveals its two arches:-

Thomas Telford's Bridge, Invermoriston

Culloden (iii)

This very modern Memorial Bench is near the path from the visitor centre to the battlefield at Culloden:-

Culloden Memorial Bench

The inscription is in Gaelic but an English translation is given on the smaller extension, “We followed you, Prince, to this ocean of flatness and bullets.”

Culloden Memorial Bench English Inscription

Another grave marker refers to the “English” dead. Many in the Duke of Cumberland’s victorious army were actually Lowland Scots. The Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 was of course a Civil War.

Culloden: "English" Gravestone

To the foreground below is a reconstruction of the sort of house that would have been present on or near the battlefield of Culloden as shown on maps from the time. In the background is the modern visitor centre. These buildings make the scene much less bleak than it used to be.

House on Culloden Battlefield

This is the back of the cottage:-

Culloden Battlefield House Rear View

Side view of cottage:-

Culloden Battlefield House Side View

Front of cottage:-

Culloden  house

Culloden (ii) Clan Grave Markers

As the wording on the cairn at the centre of the battlefield of Culloden on Drummossie Moor says, the graves of the clans are marked by the names of the clans.

Clan Fraser:-

Culloden; Grave of Clan Fraser

Mixed clans. The graves go all the way to the back of the mound:-

Culloden; Grave of Mixed Clans

Clan MacKintosh. Again, the graves go all the way to the back of the mound:-

Culloden; Graves of Clan Mackintosh

Clan Cameron. Yet again:-

Culloden; Graves of Clan Cameron

Clan Stewart of Appin:-

Culloden; Graves of Clan Stewart of Appin

Clans McGillivray, MacLean, MacLachlan and Atholl Highlanders. Nearly three hundred years on and floral tributes are still being paid:-

Culloden; Graves of Clans

Well of the Dead. Here the chief of the McGillivray fell:-

Culloden: Well of the Dead

Culloden (i)

Drummossie Moor, site of the Battle of Culloden, where Bonnie Prince Charlie suffered his first and only defeat at the end of the ’45, otherwise known as the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745-6 (an event which signalled the end of the old Highland way of life,) is one of the more dispiriting places I have visited. It seems a godforsaken area for men to have died over. I went there again this year when the good lady’s blog friend Peggy was over from the US in May. For some strange reason, though, it wasn’t as depressing this time as last. Maybe it was the presence of a Visitor Centre (built in the interim) which made it seem not so bleak and remote.

This is a close-up view of the government (Hanoverian) line – marked by the red flag.

Culloden battlefield

Thios one was taken from the centre of the battlefield. Away in the distance (blue flags) is the Jacobite start line.


This is looking back to the Governent lines (red flags) from the battlefield’s centre.

Culloden Battlefield

A cairn lies at the battlefield centre:-

Culloden Memorial Cairn

The cairn’s wording is slightly inaccurate. Yes, they fought for Prince Charlie, but in the main they fought for their clan chief (feudally) and not for Scotland per se.

Wording on Culloden Memorial Cairn

Drumnadrochit War Memorial

Drumnadrochit lies near the mouth of Glen Urquhart between where the Rivers Coiltie and Enrick debouch into an arm of Loch Ness. Its War Memorial lies on the south side of the main road as it runs along the northern part of the arm.

Drumnadrochit War Memorial

Here’s a close-up:-

Drumnadrochit War Memorial Close-up

This is one of the rare War Memorials that have a woman listed on them. Subaltern Catherine Tolmie, from World War 2. ATS is short for the Auxiliary Territorial Service, the women’s branch of the army during that war.

Drumnadrochit War Memorial Names 3

Drumnadrochit village itself is Nessie central. There is a “Nessieland” attraction and a Loch Ness Exhibition. I didn’t bother going into either.

Helensburgh War Memorial

Situated in Hermitage Park, Helensburgh’s War Memorial is fenced off behind these gates and tall hedging.

Helensburgh War Memorial Gates

Below is the view from the gates. The setting within looks pleasant enough. Was there a pond at one point?

Helensburgh War Memorial From Gate

Names are inscribed on the rectangular cartouche. There must be more on the other sides but I couldn’t get in to the fenced area to see.

Helensburgh War Memorial Close-Up

These facing ones seem to be World War 1 names, broken down by year.
World War 2 must be elsewhere on the memorial.

Helensburgh War Memorial Names

Dumbarton War Memorial

The Memorial is unusually situated some way out of the town centre, in Levengrove Park, on the banks of the River Clyde near its confluence with the River Leven, with a great view of Dumbarton Rock.

This is the view looking from the Park towards the Clyde. It’s the front of the Memorial which as a whole is surrounded by a metal fence and features a bronze angel. Note the Elephant and Castle crest of Dumbarton on the gate:-

Dumbarton War Memorial, View Towards River Clyde

Reverse of the Memorial – the view towards the Park, again with Dumbarton crest on the fence:-

Dumbarton War Memorial

Again looking into Levengrove Park but from an angle:-

Dumbarton War Memorial from Side

The names of the First World War dead are on each side, above in the original engraving; Second World War ones added below, on two sides only. This is the east side of the Memorial:-

Dumbarton War Memorial Names

The west side:-

Dumbarton War Memorial Details

Two More Glasgow War Memorials

These are in the grounds of the Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery, Glasgow; near the Cameronians Memorial.

First the West of Scotland Branch of the Normandy Veterans Association Memorial:-

West of Scotland Normandy Landings Memorial

Nearby is the City of Glasgow Squadron Auxiliary Air Force Memorial. (One of the squadron’s Spitfires is on display in the Museum):-

City of Glasgow Squadron War Mem

Pollok House, Pollok Park, Glasgow

Pollok House, not owned by but run by the National Trust for Scotland, is in the south side of Glasgow, set in great parkland; so much so you would never believe you were in the middle of a big city.

Pollok House, showing gates on to parkland of Pollok Park, Glasgow:-

Pollok House Frontage

This is a stitch of three photos to get in the full frontage. In reality the grass and road don’t have that bend in them:-

Pollok House, Glasgow

The house contains an array of paintings – mostly of that branch of the Hapsburg family who ruled Spain for centuries. Being notoriously in-bred they are a fairly unprepossessing bunch. The very informative guide was much more taken with this painting by El Greco of rather different content; Lady in a Fur Wrap (picture from BBC Your Paintings):-

Lady in a Fur Wrap, El Greco, Pollok House, Glasgow

A certificate on an internal wall on the corridor leading to the tea-room (which has a marvellous setting, being housed in what was the Edwardian kitchen) commemorates the house’s use as a hospital during the Great War:-

Pollok House Great War Certificate

On a wall of Pollok House’s garden facing the parkland area there is a War Memorial dedicated to the men from the tenantry and staff of Nether Pollok who served in the Great War. There are 58 names on the cartouche. Beside 13 of them is inscribed “killed” – beside another it states “died”.

Pollok House War Memorial

That makes 14 out of the 58 who went away that lost their lives as a consequence. A fraction under a quarter of the total. And some of the others would have been wounded.

Invermoriston War Memorial

A simple granite obelisk on a stepped granite plinth. Situated at junction of A 82 and A 887, in Invermoriston village, just off Loch Ness.

“To Our Glorious Dead.” 14 WW1 names, 6 WW2.

Invermoriston War Memorial

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