Archives » 1970s

Reelin’ In the Years 90: The Lies In Your Eyes

Not had one from Sweet for a while.

This again is from their later phase.

Sweet: The Lies In Your Eyes

Reelin’ In the Years 89: Late Again

Just about everyone’s memories of Stealers Wheel start (and most people’s end) with Stuck in the Middle With You with the addition of, perhaps, Star, but the first time I encountered them was on the release of the eponymous LP and what I believe was their initial UK TV appearance where they performed the opening track Late Again. The blend of the voices of Joe Egan and Gerry Rafferty was distinctive and different to anything else around at the time.

Late Again may be a little slow in tempo (some may even think it a dirge) but it stuck with me and I later bought the album.

Stealers Wheel: Late Again

Reelin’ In the Years 88: Blue Guitar

After their next LP, Seventh Sojourn, which spawned two singles in Isn’t Life Strange and I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band) both of which – unlike The Story in Your Eyes – troubled the charts, the Moody Blues broke up.

During the five years they spent apart most of them released solo LPs but the most successful venture was a collaboration between Justin Hayward and John Lodge which produced the LP Blue Jays but most memorably the song Blue Guitar, a no 8 hit in the UK. According to the Wiki article above Hayward actually recorded this with 10cc rather than Lodge but nevertheless the two took “Blue Jays” on the road mainly – as I recall Lodge introducing the track on stage – because of Blue Guitar.

Here they are performing it (ie miming) on Supersonic.

Justin Hayward and John Lodge: Blue Guitar

Reelin’ In the Years 87: The Story In Your Eyes

I’ve already mentioned the odd decision to release Watching and Waiting rather than Gypsy as the single from To Our Children’s Children’s Children. The former was an ideal coda to the album but not really single material.

The single that came after, Question, was the Moodies most successful in the new era, only being kept off the No. 1 slot by the England World Cup squad’s Back Home. (Oh tempora!) Despite being described as, “One of the world’s most advanced groups,” while promoting the song on Top of the Pops, the LP it prefaced, A Question of Balance, gave the first indication that collectively the band was going off the boil.

Their next single didn’t even make the UK charts despite being a belter. First below is not the album version from Every Good Boy Deserves Favour. This one has a different vocal performance and a more lush mellotron sound. The more familiar album edition follows.

The Moody Blues: The Story In Your Eyes

Reelin’ In the Years 86: Fly Too High

I was in a garden centre yesterday (as you do) and caught the name tag euonymus on one of the plants. Immediately the first two words of this song (“Anonymous, autonomous,”) popped into my head. I realised I hadn’t heard it in ages. It took me a minute or two to work it through to the chorus (“Run too fast, Fly too high,”) before I got the title. I looked it up on You Tube as soon as I got home. It still sounds good.

According to Wikipedia the single of this wasn’t a hit in the US but it reached the dizzy heights of no. 44 in the UK.

Janis Ian: Fly Too High

Reelin’ In the Years 85: The Poacher

The Small Faces and The Faces were both talent filled bands whose members were not just adjuncts to lead singers Steve Marriott and Rod Stewart. Guitarist Ronnie Wood famously went on to join The Rolling Stones.

Bass guitarist Ronnie Lane also had a (relatively) successful post Faces existence making several albums with his band Slim Chance – curtailed somewhat by the diagnosis of his multiple sclerosis in the 1970s wich eventually led to his death in 1997. So it goes.

The Poacher was one of his hits.

Ronnie Lane (and Slim Chance): The Poacher

Reelin’ In the Years 84: Year Of The Cat

Al Stewart in his prime.

A live version here of one of his best.

Al Stewart: Year Of The Cat

Reelin’ In the Years 83: Fox on the Run

I’ve not had one from The Sweet for a while.

This was the first of their hits that they’d written themselves.

Sweet: Fox on the Run

Reelin’ In the Years 82: Gasoline Alley Bred

From the time when The Hollies were moving over from pure pop (He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother notwithstanding) to a more guitar based sound.

The Hollies: Gasoline Alley Bred

Reelin’ In the Years 81: Benediction

This is perhaps my favourite Stealers Wheel track.

It was never released as a single as far as I know and came from the third Stealers Wheel album Right or Wrong. By the time it appeared the group had long since ceased to exist and both its leading lights, Gerry Rafferty and Joe Egan, were no longer working together.

From the outside I would say that the lyric maybe says a lot about a West of Scotland RC upbringing.

Stealers Wheel: Benediction

free hit counter script