Archives » 1960s

Friday On My Mind 101: On the Road Again

I’m away from home, so this song’s title seemed appropriate.


Canned Heat: On the Road Again

Friday On My Mind 100: Rag Mama Rag

This song gained the Band their highest UK chart placing, a no 16 compared to the no 21 The Weight achieved.

The Band: Rag Mama Rag

Not Friday On My Mind 23: Night of the Long Grass

In one of my early posts about The Troggs I mentioned a promotional film they made while walking about in a forest and that I could no longer find it on the web.

Well, now I have – except their stripy jackets are nowhere in evidence.

The Troggs:-Night of the Long Grass (forest video)

Not Friday On My Mind 22: Sweet Dream

The follow up to Living in the Past. As I recall this was a hit at the back end of 1969 and on into 1970. The group’s second single to reach the top ten.

Jethro Tull: Sweet Dream

Andy Jardine

I’ve just seen from the club website that one of Sons’ most loyal servants, left back Andy Jardine, has died.

He played a total of 364 games for the club in the 1950s and 60s – including 309 times with Tommy Govan as his partner at full back.

The pairing more or less picked itself. I can still hear the Boghead announcer intoning, “Robertson, Govan and Jardine,” or “Crawford, Govan and Jardine,” as the first three names on the team sheet.

Andy’s last appearance for the club was historic in another sense. It was in the 5-1 win over Third Lanark which was that club’s last ever game.

My last memory of Andy is of that Christmas Day game at Love Street, Paisley in 1971 when big Roy McCormack scored the best goal I’ve ever seen by a Sons player. Andy wasn’t playing, he was a spectator – can of beer in hand (yes, you could bring beer into the ground in those days) – dispensing ex-player’s wisdom to his successor at left back that day, Billie Wilkinson. “Nice wee nudge, son. Oh, unlucky. He’s seen it.”

Andy Jardine, long-standing left back. So it goes.

Not Friday On My Mind 21: Pictures Of Lily

Another admonitory tale.

I remember this single being advertised on the NME – complete with pictures of Lily.

There is a video of this on You Tube showing pictures of various Lilies. Not quite the thing for the blog though.

The Who: Pictures Of Lily

Friday On My Mind 99: I Close My Eyes and Count to Ten

A Clive Westlake song that is lyrically reminiscent of last week’s first offering by Goffin and King in the lines, “Tomorrow will you still be here? / Tomorrow will come but I fear / that what is happening to me is only a dream…” but sung by the performer of the second.

Like Goin’ Back this is just a little heavy on the orchestral backing but it has power and pathos both.

Dusty Springfield: I Close My Eyes and Count to Ten

Friday on My Mind 98: RIP Gerry Goffin. Goin’ Back

I woke up this morning to the news that Gerry Goffin has died.

In his collaborations with Carole King hewrote the lyrics to some of the most enduring popular songs from the 1960s. The list is stunning. At the end of the article in the link are songs he wrote with others.

His lyrics tended to be carefully worked out and belied the frothy nature of the productions of the era.

Look at the words of Will You Love Me Tomorrow. Their underlying poignancy was highlighted in King’s own version on her album, Tapestry.

Tonight you’re mine completely/You give your love so sweetly.
Tonight the light of love is in your eyes/But will you love me tomorrow?

Is this a lasting treasure/Or just a moment’s pleasure?
Can I believe the magic of your sighs?/Will you still love me tomorrow?

Tonight with words unspoken/You say that I’m the only one
But will my heart be broken/When the night meets the morning sun?

I’d like to know that your love/Is love I can be sure of.
So tell me now and I won’t ask again/Will you still love me tomorrow?

This, though, is the early 60s take by The Shirelles.

The Shirelles: Will you Love Me Tomorrow

And then there’s this:-

A little bit of freedom’s all we lack.
So catch me if you can I’m goin’ back.

Dusty Springfield: Goin’ Back

Gerald “Gerry” Goffin: 11/2/1939 – 19/6/2014. So it goes.

Not Friday On My Mind 20: Never Comes The Day

Tuesday Afternoon was followed as a single by Voices in the Sky (with its flute flourishes and distinctive vocal from Justin Hayward) which, like its follow-up, the hard-driving perennial favourite Ride My See-Saw, featured on the next LP, the even more pretentious concept album, In Search of the Lost Chord. That was the first Moody Blues LP I bought – possibly my first ever and there’s barely a dud on it – with the possible exception of the spoken passages and the final track OM. Its standout is the Ray Thomas song Legend of a Mind embedded within the House of Four Doors sequence with its classical pretensions placing the group’s output firmly in Prog territory.

By this time the Moodies were firmly established as my favourite band.

Then we had this song – later to feature on On The Threshold of a Dream – which I remember in its review of the single the NME referred to as “beautifully constructed.” Here the group plays it live.

The Moody Blues: Never Comes The Day

Not Friday On My Mind 19: Tuesday Afternoon

I didn’t buy the Moodies’ next single, Tuesday Afternoon, a song which – like Nights In White Satin – appeared also on the LP Days of Future Passed but I remember hearing it on the radio and thinking it was almost as good. It seems the single version was edited down to a ludicrous 2 minutes 16 seconds – missing out the repeat of the opening riff and Tuesday afternoon chorus.

This is how it appeared on the LP and so contains the orchestral afterpiece tagged on by conductor Peter Knight. Knight’s “classical music” interludes linked all the songs on the LP – supposedly to demonstrate the record label Deram’s new “Deramic Sound System.” The story that the band were asked to record an album based on Dvorak’s New World symphony but instead recorded their own songs without the label’s knowledge has been disputed.

Edited (7/6/14) to add:- Those orchestral interludes and the fact that it was a concept album probably make Days of Future Passed one of the first prog rock albums.

The Moody Blues: Tuesday Afternoon

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