Archives » 1960s

Not Friday on my Mind 41: Paradise Lost

The Herd’s follow-up to From the Underworld kind of carried on from where that one left off but Paradise Lost was still a very odd concoction, with its intro and coda reminiscent of The Stripper but Prog leanings elsewhere.

(By contrast the band’s third single – which I featured in a different context here – was straightforward bouncy pop song.)

The Herd: Paradise Lost

Friday on my Mind 134: From the Underworld

When a very young Peter Frampton joined The Herd, the group with whom he made his name, they had just been dropped by Parlophone, but simultaneously brought in composers Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley, who had written a barrowload of hits for Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich and signed up to Fontana. The songs concocted for the Herd were of a different order to those hits though. Elements of psychedelia and glimmerings of prog rock are here.

The Herd: From the Underworld

Friday on my Mind 133: Maxine’s Parlour

(I had scheduled this for 24/6/16 but a certain referendum result happening and then the anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme took up the last two Friday postings. Better late then never.)

You’ve just got to love the name of the band that recorded this. Crocheted Doughnut Ring. So sixties.
The song’s treatment is also very much of its time what with the flute, the drum rolls, mellotron and all.

Crocheted Doughnut Ring: Maxine’s Parlour

Not Friday on my Mind 40: RIP Paul McDowell

As I said before The Temperance Seven were one of my elder brother’s favourites back in the Trad Jazz boom. This week I learned their laid back singer Paul McDowell has passed away. His vocal style led to the nickname Whispering Paul.

I already featured their hits which my brother bought in the post linked to above, so here are the B-sides.

(That Parlophone label really takes me back.)

The Temperance Seven: Charley My Boy (B-side of You’re Driving Me Crazy)

The Temperance Seven: Sugar (B-side of Pasadena)

The Temperance Seven: Chili Bom Bom (B-side of Hard Hearted Hannah)

“Whispering” Paul McDowell: 15/8/ 1931 – 2/5/ 2016. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 132: RIP Dave Swarbrick

I wasn’t that much into folk rock. I was certainly aware though of the importance of Fairport Convention to that form of music and of Dave Swarbrick whose death was announced earlier this month.

This medley of The Lark in the Morning, Rakish Paddy, Foxhunters’ Jig and Toss the Feathers was arranged by and features heavily the fiddle of Mr Swarbrick.

Fairport Convention: Medley

David Cyril Eric Swarbrick: 5/4/1941 – 3/6/2016. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 131: Call Me Number One

Having as a song title (Call Me) Number One is something of a hostage to fortune and so it proved for The Tremeloes. It only reached number 2.

The Tremeloes: (Call Me) Number One

Not Friday on my Mind 39: Wilhelmina

I was sad to hear of the death of Andy Newman who lent his nickname to the group of whose biggest hit, Something in the Air (see Friday on my Mind 28) this song, an odd mix of oompah music, kazoo and a rock guitar solo, was the B-side.

My copy of the single did not credit Wilhelmina as the B-side as both were labelled Something in the Air. I’ve often wondered if that was a one-off mistake and my copy is a real rarity.

Andy “Thunderclap” Newman: 21/11/1942-20/3/2016. So it goes.

Thunderclap Newman : Wilhelmina

George Martin RIP

What do you say about the man who brought us The Beatles? The man largely responsible for the soundscapes of those ground breaking recordings of the mid-sixties starting with Revolver and continuing through Sgt Pepper (please note; not Sgt Pepper’s; not in Britain, anyway) and Magical Mystery Tour. By the time of The White Album a lot of that sonic experimentation had gone (Revolution No 9 excepted) though the album for the Yellow Submarine film stemmed from the same seam.

Martin was a crucial part of the Beatles’ sound, his facility with arrangements and classical accompaniment giving them a dimension – or dimensions – which on their own or with a different producer might never have arisen. I remember seeing him on a TV documentary saying he had come up with and played the piano interlude on a well-known song which I think was Lovely Rita.

The Beatles: Lovely Rita

I also seem to recall that the “final” version of Strawberry Fields Forever was a mix of two takes which had originally been played in different keys. One was slowed down slightly the other speeded up so that they would synch, which gave it that weird effect that it still has all these years later.

The Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever

Then there was all that stuff with looping and playing tapes backward. Think of the swirling accordion/funfair sound in Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite.

The Beatles: Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite

Immense.

George Henry Martin: 3/1/1926 – 8/3/2016. So it goes.

Reelin’ In the Years 117: Evie. RIP Stevie Wright

I’ve come to this late. Stevie Wright, lead singer of Australian band The Easybeats, whose Friday on my Mind I chose as the first song in my 1960s music category of the same name, died in December. I only saw his obituary in The Guardian earlier this week.

Evie was a solo no 1 hit for him in Australia, possibly the first 11 minute song to reach no 1 anywhere in the world.

The song manages to encompass the three main themes of the love song as a form. Its first two parts are reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac’s Oh Well or Derek and the Dominos’ Layla in that it starts in an up tempo rocking style and then segues into quieter mode. Like Evie both those were split over two sides of the corresponding single release. Evie, however, returns to a higher tempo for its third part.

Stevie Wright: Evie

Stephen Carlton “Stevie” Wright: 20/12/1947 – 27/12/2015. So it goes.

Friday on my Mind 130: Wooden Ships

This song is more associated with Crosby, Stills and Nash but was co-written by Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship and Starship, who died earlier this week. Apparently his name could not be put on the CSN release of the song for legal reasons but Kantner contributed to the lyrics. Both CSN and Jefferson Airplane performed the song at Woodstock but Airplane’s (very long) version did not appear in the film.

Jefferson Airplane: Wooden Ships

Paul Lorin Kantner: 17/3/1941–28/1/2016. So it goes.

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