Archives » Bridges

Queensferry Crossing (ii)

These photos were taken in March 2015.

Northern support pillar:-

New Forth Road Bridge 7

Northern cable stay tower:-

New Forth Road Bridge 8

Southern and centre cable stay towers:-

New Forth Road Bridge 9

Southern cable stay tower and support pillars:-

New Forth Road Bridge 10

Queensferry Crossing (i)

Queensferry Crossing is the name of the New Forth Road Bridge, now under construction. Personally I think they ought to have embraced the pun and called it the Fifth Bridge since there are now two bridges at Kincardine-on-Forth plus the Forth Bridge (the rail bridge) and the Road Bridge.

I started taking photographs in October 2014 but haven’t got round to posting them till now. The first three are from the North Queensferry side.

This is a support pillar for the carriageway on the north side:-

New Forth Road Bridge 2

The northern cable stay tower:-

New Forth Road Bridge 1

Centre and southern cable stay towers:-

New Forth Road Bridge 3

These three are from the South Queensferry end.

South support pillars and bridge starting to be winched out. Note temporary cable stay arrangement:-

New Forth Road Bridge 4

All three cable stay towers:-

New Forth Road Bridge 5

Original Forth Road Bridge plus new crossing’s centre and north cable stay towers:-

New Forth Road Bridge 6

The Ford at Geddington

We took a stroll around Geddington (see previous post) and found a lovely bridge. The bridge is only wide enough for one car/vehicle at a time. You can see here the ford beside it which allows simultaneous passage. (We did see a driver chicken out of tackling the ford though):-

Bridge + Ford

View of the ford and river from the bridge:-

The Ford at Geddington

Buxton

The spa town of Buxton has a lot of fine classical architecture, not the least of which is the spa itself.

Buxton Spa

Close-up on bit to left. The writing on the building says Natural Mineral Bath:-

Buxton Spa

This is the view from the War Memorial:-

Buxton  spa

And from the town, showing aspects of the spa building to the right of the previous photos:-

Buxton spa stitch

Buxton also sports a fine Opera House:-

Buxton  Opera House

I read that this building, now part of Buxton and Leek College, had the largest dome in the world at the time it was built:-

Buxton and Leek College Building

River and bridge in Buxton Park:-

Buxton park

Miniature Railway in Buxton Park:-

Buxton Miniature Railway in Park

Footbridge, Stonehaven

Good wrought iron work on this bridge over the Carron Water, near the Carron Restaurant:-

Lovely Footbridge, Stonehaven

Loch Shiel and Glenfinnan Viaduct

On the way up to Inverness with the good lady’s blogfriend Peggy we stopped off at Glenfinnan to view Loch Shiel, the Glenfinnan Monument and the railway viaduct.

Loch Shiel from near the monument:-

Loch Shiel from Level of Loch

Loch Shiel from viewpoint. The monument is at the centre of the photo:-

Loch Shiel from Viewpoint

Glenfinnan Viaduct from viewpoint (about 180 degrees from above photo):-

Glenfinnan Viaduct from Viewpoint

Glenfinnan Viaduct close-up:-

Glenfinnan Viaduct

The Falls at Invermoriston

Telford’s Bridge (see previous post) spans the falls of the River Moriston at Invermoriston village.

The falls from the side of Thomas Telford’s Bridge:-

Falls at Invermoriston

From the bridge itself:-

Falls at Invermoriston

Upper falls of River Moriston from Thomas Telford’s bridge:-

Invermoriston Upper Falls

Looking to the “new” bridge, which was built in the 1930s:-

Invermoriston, Falls and New Bridge

Arch of “new” bridge at Invermoriston. I don’t know what the structure that can be seen through the arch and is perched above the river is:-

Invermoriston, New Bridge +

Thomas Telford’s Bridge at Invermoriston

Invermoriston lies near Loch Ness, in the Highlands, 7 miles from the loch’s foot at Fort Augustus.

Apart from some Highland cows in a field by the car park and its War Memorial (which I featured here) its most interesting feature is the bridge built by engineer Thomas Telford in 1813.

The bridge was superseded by a new one in the 1930s and its approaches are now in considerable disrepair:-

Thomas Telford's Bridge at Invermoriston

This is taken from off to the right of the one above:-

Arch of Thomas Telford's Bridge, Invermoriston

Viewing it from down on the river from the other side of the bridge reveals its two arches:-

Thomas Telford's Bridge, Invermoriston

Falls of Dochart, Killin

On our trips around the country with the good lady’s blog pal Peggy we ventured west and took a small detour to Killin to see the Falls of Dochart.

It only occurred to me later that I should have taken a video to show the movement of the water and capture the noise.

Falls of Dochart (i)
Looking towards Killin. Bridge in background. The river (Dochart) divides in two just before here then merges again where the bridge crosses it at Killin village.

Falls of Dochart (ii)
Looking upstream from road to west.

Falls of Dochart (iii)
Looking back towards site of photo (i).

Falls of Dochart (iv)
Looking downstream to bridge.

Falls of Dochart (v)
Looking upstream from bridge.

Falls of Dochart (vi)
Looking upstream from bridge to other strand of river.

Falls of Dochart (vii)
Showing where the river merges again.

Falls of Dochart (viii)
Looking downstream from bridge.

Falls of Dochart (ix)
Looking from old mill across to where photo (i) was taken.

Stirling Bridges

A bridge has spanned the River Forth at Stirling for centuries. Not the same one obviously but the most famous of them was the one where William Wallace won his great victory over the army of Edward I of England (Edward Longshanks) at the eponymous battle in 1297.

The “old” bridge that still survives now carries foot traffic only. It was built 500-600 years ago. It is a lovely structure of four arches and three supports, here shown from the “east” bank.

Old Stirling Bridge

These are the approaches from the west. Note the cobblestones:-

Old Stirling Bridge Approaches

This is the old bridge from the modern road bridge:-

Old Stirling Bridge From Modern Bridge

And this is a view from the “west” bank. The Wallace Monument can be seen as a distant spire beside the lamp standard at the extreme right of the bridge as seen here:-

Old Stirling Bridge Spans

Two “modern” bridges also cross the Forth close by. This is the railway bridge from the modern road bridge:-

Railway Bridge at Stirling

The road bridge is in the foreground here with the railway bridge supports visible through its arches:-

Modern Stirling Bridges

The Wallace Monument from the old bridge:-

Wallace Monument

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