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Fife’s Art Deco Heritage 15 (i): Rosyth

We got fairly well acquainted with Rosyth, a Fife town on the Firth of Forth west of but very close to the Forth Bridges, when we were house-hunting. We opted for elsewhere in the end.

Rosyth is most famous for its Naval Dockyard but is home to some deco.

The Clydesdale Bank building, on Queensferry Road, has an Art Deco frontage, at least in its older aspect, built 1932:-

Clydesdale Bank Building, Rosyth

This modern addition (to the left of photo above) isn’t though:-

Clydesdale Bank, Rosyth, Modern Addition

The former Palace Cinema, also on Queensferry Road, from left.

Former Cinema, Rosyth

Palace Cinema from right:-

Former Palace Cinema, Rosyth

Shop with slightly edged flat roof on Admiralty Road. Windows replaced.

Art Deco Style Shop, Rosyth

1930s Houses, Cairneyhill

Cairneyhill is a village in the west of Fife, between Dunfermline and Kincardine

These flat-roofed houses have a touch of deco to them especialy the stepping on the roofline.

From main road:-

1930s Houses Cairneyhill

From access road:-

Cairneyhill 1930s Houses Frontage

Fife’s Art Deco Heritage 14: Cupar

There isn’t much deco in Cupar, Fife’s quondam County Town. I’ve already posted a picture of Luvian’s café/ice cream/wine shop. Last time I was in Cupar I thought the Bank of Scotland had some deco influence, especially on the lower fascia.

Bank of Scotland, Cupar

While we’re on Cupar; and completely differently in terms of achitecture I also noticed this triangular cartouche at the top of a very old building’s gable. 1623!

Carved cartouche, Cupar, Fife

Painting with Light

For the past couple of weeks I’ve been watching Andrew Graham-Dixon’s BBC 4 TV series The Art of Scandinavia. It’s over now but you can still catch it on the iPlayer.

I hadn’t heard of a lot of the artists but there were some great landscapes in the Norway episode.

The painting which struck me most however was by a Danish artist, Vilhelm Hammershøi. It’s called Dust Motes Dancing in the Sunbeams. I found an illustration on the net on this page and I reproduce it below.

Dust Motes: Vilhelm Hammershøi

A stunning depiction of light, I hope you’ll agree.

In its use of the qualities of light I was immediately reminded of John Henry Lorimer’s Spring Moonlight, which I blogged about here.

As well as Spring Moonlight, which I forgot to mention in the previous post about it is a huge canvas, Kirkcaldy Art Gallery also has on display at the moment two further Lorimer pieces of more normal dimensions, Sundown in Spring, Kellie Castle:-

Sundown in Spring, Kellie Castle: Lorimer

and View of Kellie Castle:-

View of Kellie Castle

both of which exemplify Lorimer’s distinctive style. The pictures are taken from Art UK which is the successor site to BBC’s Your Paintings.

Kellie Castle was the home of the Lorimer family and is worth a visit if you’re ever over in the East of Fife.

Falkland War Memorial

Falkland is a village quite close to where I now live and at present houses one of those Fife libraries which are to be shut down.

The village’s dominating landmark is Falkland Palace the hunting lodge of Scotland’s Stuart Kings (and Queens.)

The village does have a relation to the perhaps more famous location in the South Atlantic as the Falkland Islands were named after Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount of Falkland. The Viscounts Falkland took their title from Falkland Palace.

Falkland’s War Memorial is relatively new, being erected only in the last year or so. The names are listed under First World War, Second World War, Other Conflicts. The word dziękuję, which I believe is Polish for “thank you”, is inscribed at the bottom, though there aren’t any Polish names on the memorial, as far as I can make out.

Falkland War Memorial

Reverse view. Arms of Falkland in the cartouche:-

Falkland War Memorial Reverse

The old memorial was a plaque which has been housed in various locations in the village. The below is from the Scottish Military Research Group’s website where the plaque was said to be within the building occupied by “Smart Cookies” – a children’s play-group. I believe the plaque has now been moved to the Village Hall.

Old Falkland War Memorial Plaque

Libraries Now Doomed

Fife Council has decided to go ahead with the closure of sixteen libraries in the county. This includes three of those closest to me and which I use regularly.

(I note in the newspaper article in the first link above the occurence of the spelling calamatous. Did the author by any chance mean calamitous? Did no one in an editorial capacity notice?)

Fife Libraries Temporary Reprieve

It seems there has been a stay of execution on the threatened Fife Libraries.

The Council’s Scrutiny Committee has apparently rejected the proposals and suggested a one year moratorium to explore possibilities for keeping library services. There will be a meeting this Tuesday (12th Jan) to discuss the closures.

I have fired off emails in support of the campaign against closures to members of the Council committee concerned.

It also looks like I shall have to continue borrowing books…

Library News

Despite the campaign against the closures and my efforts at borrowing books this year to attempt to keep the numbers up Fife councillors yesterday opted to close all 16 of the libraries that were under threat. That of course includes the two which I use most frequently.

How soon before more are shut down?

Fife’s Art Deco Heritage 13: Burntisland

A very minor piece of deco. The TSB branch:-

TSB Burntisland

Kinghorn War Memorial

Situated at the junction of High Steet and Rossland Place (leading on to Pettycur Road) the Memorial has statues of two soldiers atop a plinth. This side (facing the High Street) bears the names of WW1 dead:-

Kinghorn War Memorial

Reverse View (WW2 Names):-

Kinghorn War Memorial Reverse View

A wider perspective:-

Kinghorn War Memorial Wider View

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